Tax Relief for Low and Middleincome Nova Scotians

first_imgMore than 500,000 low- and middle-income Nova Scotians are receiving tax relief because of tax changes that came into effect Jan. 1. Those changes mean about 63,000 more Nova Scotians will not pay any provincial income tax in 2018. The savings amount to as much as $264 per year. “This is more money staying in the pockets of low- and middle-income Nova Scotians,” said Premier Stephen McNeil. “Nova Scotians who need it the most are getting more support because of our province’s strong finances.” The relief comes through an increase in the tax-free basic personal amount. Low-income earners see the most benefit, with the amount increasing 35 per cent to $11,481 from $8,481 for 2018. The increase declines as income rises, until it is phased out for people with a taxable income of at least $75,000. “Getting our province’s finances in order means we can provide tax relief while also investing in more services and programs,” said Finance and Treasury Board Minister Karen Casey. “This is one of the largest tax breaks in our province’s recent history.” Nova Scotians will save $85 million annually because of this measure.last_img read more

New Regulations for Natural Gas Contracts

first_imgGovernment has approved new regulations under the Public Utilities Act that give the Utility and Review Board the ability to approve long-term natural gas pipeline contracts. This change creates consistency by giving Nova Scotia Power the same opportunities available under the Gas Distribution Act. Long-term agreements have the potential to provide Nova Scotians with reliable access to natural gas while keeping electricity prices stable for ratepayers. The Utility and Review Board will independently consider if proposed agreements are in the best interests of ratepayers. -30-last_img

Week In Tech Verizon lures millennials with mobile video LA Philharmonic launches

This undated image provided by Verizon shows a screen shot of a content section of the Go90 app. Verizon is starting a new mobile video service that’s aimed at young people who are increasingly choosing to watch TV on their phones and tablets. Go90, is free and will have ads. It will show live events like NFL football games and concerts and TV shows, including “The Daily Show,” a day after they air on TV. (Verizon via AP) Week In Tech: Verizon lures millennials with mobile video; LA Philharmonic launches VR venture by The Associated Press Posted Sep 8, 2015 1:44 pm MDT Last Updated Sep 8, 2015 at 2:40 pm MDT AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to RedditRedditShare to 電子郵件Email NEW YORK, N.Y. – VERIZON LURES MILLENNIALSVerizon is starting a new mobile video service that’s aimed at young people who are increasingly choosing to watch TV on their phones and tablets.The service, called Go90, is free and will have ads. It will show live events like NFL football games and concerts and TV shows, including “The Daily Show,” a day after they air on TV. There will also be Web series available.You don’t have to be a Verizon Wireless customer to use Go90, but some content will only be available for Verizon customers. That includes NFL games and shows from media conglomerates Discovery, Scripps and Viacom, including “The Daily Show.”The service is being rolled out this month and is expected to be widely available by the end of the month.Verizon is the country’s largest wireless carrier. The No. 2 carrier, AT&T, is also trying to marry TV and mobile. It bought DirecTV in July for $48.5 billion and has begun offering a package of satellite TV and wireless service that saves customers $10 a month.— Tali Arbel, AP Technology Writer___L.A. PHILHARMONIC GOES VIRTUALThe Los Angeles Philharmonic orchestra is trying to get more people to experience classical music concerts, almost as if they were there, by putting on a virtual reality headset.As part of “Van Beethoven,” the orchestra is sending a decked-out truck around the L.A. area starting Friday to give locals a bite-sized taste of classical music — Beethoven’s Fifth Symphony — as if they were in the concert hall.Wearing either the Oculus or the Samsung Gear virtual reality headset, listeners can see a 360 degree video of the orchestra as it plays inside L.A.’s Walt Disney Concert Hall. Besides seeing the audience’s perspective, though, you are taken down to the orchestra floor, so close to conductor Gustavo Dudamel that you can almost reach out and touch him.Virtual reality is a “great opportunity to help people see things they wouldn’t see,” said Amy Seidenwurm, director of digital initiatives at the Philharmonic. For people who have been to the concerts, she added, VR can show new perspectives.The Philharmonic is also launching free virtual reality apps for the headsets.— Barbara Ortutay, AP Technology Writer read more