The Observer view on the cessation of hostilities in Yemen

first_img | Pick Report Share Share on Facebook Share Share on Facebook Twitter 4 Nov 2018 18:06 | Pick Facebook 4 Nov 2018 19:01 Report Report The houthis started this war when they burst out of their Sa’adah stronghold and decided to take over the whole country by force. The suffering of Yemen’s weakest, particularly the already despised and disadvantaged, Akhdam, who are my kith and kin as black person, pains me deeply. But we must never forget that this war is legal and in support of the nationally recognised government of Yemen. Houthis must go back to Sa’adah before any ceasefire or we will be setting a worrying precedent to all aggressors in the region and beyond. | Pick Immediate cessation of war will reward Houthi aggression. Report TheGoodRoad Share on Twitter Share on Twitter 3 4 ploughmanlunch Twitter Share on Facebook Facebook | Pick Yemen Opinion FreeExpress55 Reply Share Twitter Jamal Khashoggi Middle East and North Africa Twitter Twitter Share Reply Report Reply Share on WhatsApp 1 2 Share Report Share on Facebook collapsed memeroots recommendations emiliofloris Twitter 50 | Pick Share on Facebook Report Share on Facebook Share Report Comments 108 Reply | Pick Share on Facebook Reply Report Bathreader Share on Twitter 40 41 4 Nov 2018 22:57 bakersdozen Facebook You are correct about the West looking after their interests. Of course they are. But it is simply dishonest and disingenuous to even imply that the Yemeni people are with the Houthis. They are not. They blame the Houthis for starting a crazy war of aggression. The real question is this: how on earth did they think they can march all the way to Aden and subdue Yemen’s famously warlike tribes through force of arms? Utter madness. Share on Facebook Report Share 4 Nov 2018 23:12 Twitter 2 3 Mohammed bin Salman 13 14 Share imperium3 US foreign policy Reply Share Facebook Thank goodness for Trump !We can conveniently seek to evade responsibility for our part in the Yemen tragedy by focusing almost exclusively on US indifference to human rights.Trump didn’t invent US hypocrisy, bullying and war mongering, he just removed the thin veil of respectability and made it impossible to ignore. Reply Share on Twitter | Pick 4 Nov 2018 23:13 4 Nov 2018 20:51 emiliofloris 5 Nov 2018 3:18 Radleyman Twitter Order by oldest 2 3 *every time* Share on Facebook | Pick Share on Facebook Reply | Pick Facebook | Pick Report 5 Nov 2018 0:09 Share on Facebook | Pick Donald Trump’s intervention in the Yemen war would be welcome if it didn’t seem so cynical and ill-judged Why is the death of one journalist suddenly a reason for action, when the deaths, injuries and disruptions of thousands upon thousands of Yemenis counted for nothing and never resulted in any action? Not just by the US. Britain did not act. And the Guardian has given far more attention to the death of this one journalist, nasty as it is, than to the horror which has been endlessly perpetrated on the Yemeni people!! The life of one journalist gets more reaction than the deaths and starvation of thousands of Yemeni children. God help us. Facebook Share Read more Share on Twitter Twitter Share on Facebook wheresmehat This comment was removed by a moderator because it didn’t abide by our community standards. Replies may also be deleted. For more detail see our FAQs. Facebook Share on Twitter | Pick Down2dirt Share on Facebook Share on Facebook 4 Nov 2018 21:36 Twitter Report 6 7 4 Nov 2018 19:23 wheresmehat sksmith1000 2 Reply Share on Twitter Facebook 5 6 Share on Twitter 3 4 Share on Facebook | Pick Share Facebook Report emiliofloris If it stops this disgraceful ‘war’ then it cannot really be seen as a bad thing. That it has been allowed to comtinue for so lomg is a disgrace A disgrace that the media should share given the paucity of coverage. Reply Reply Twitter wheresmehat Report Facebook 6 7 Report 1 Share on Twitter 22 23 4 Nov 2018 21:55 2 …given that the appalling, avoidable toll on Yemeni lives exacted by the Saudi-led, western-backed bombing campaign has been well documented over the past three years? Reply SomlanderBrit Facebook Share on Twitter Share | Pick Report Reply ploughmanlunch 2 3 Twitter Facebook | Pick Twitter Everyone you hear about, or see, images from this conflict, remember it’s your petro-dollars that pay for it. Nada89 Some of you folks try to sound intelligent, but have absolutely no idea as to what you are talking about. Where did I say Yemenis are with Houthis? I leave that for the Yemenis to decide. The coalition that took over Sana’a, made up of Yemeni military and the so called Houthis (they are actually more than that) stopped daily al Qaeda terrorist bombing in Sana’a. They moved rapidly and took Aden without much resistance. The only people who fought them were al Qaeda allied tribes and many abandoned al Qaeda. Yemeni army and Houthis would have consolidated the rest of Yemen within a month. Their proposal for the new constitution was very clear, Saudi Arabia through Hadi wanted 6 regional federal states 5 of the under their control. That wasn’t flying with anyone in Yemen. Who gave Saudi the right to meddle in Yemen’s affair? A dictatorship with no election or constitution writing a constitution for a country whose people can’t stand Saudis. Give it break man! Twitter Bathreader Report Share The US proposal, backed by Britain, for a “cessation of hostilities” in Yemen, to be followed by UN-led peace talks, is welcome. But it raises a number of questions. Why has it taken so long for the Trump administration to act, given that the appalling, avoidable toll on Yemeni lives exacted by the Saudi-led, western-backed bombing campaign has been well documented over the past three years?Could it be that this sudden burst of American diplomatic activity is linked to last month’s murder by Saudi government agents of the journalist Jamal Khashoggi? In point of fact, there seems little doubt the two events are connected. Donald Trump has shown little or no interest in the Yemen war until now, viewing it as but one of many theatres in a wider, strategic contest between the US, Israel and its Gulf Arab allies on the one hand and Iran on the other. Iran’s backing and arming of Yemen’s Houthi rebels was apparently sufficient reason to turn a blind eye to civilian suffering. In any case, Trump has no appetite for the hard slog of peace-making, as Syrians, Palestinians and Koreans know to their cost. Share on Facebook Facebook Show 3 more replies All Share Share expanded 5 Nov 2018 3:57 Twitter SomlanderBrit Share on Facebook anniegyg FreeExpress55 The responsibility for the suffering in Yemen lies almost entirely with the rebels who started civil war ,if they wish to end their rebellion the country can start to recover. The Iranians have exploited the conflict Hadi is happy in the Saudi hotel. He will never go back, he is a prop. 4 Nov 2018 18:13 US,UK and the so called civilised democratic governments don’t actually give a Shiit about Yemen,Palestine the Rohingya people and others,because it’s simply doesn’t serve their interests. Hypocrisy and double standards of turning a blind eye to what the Saudis , the Israelis and Myanmar regimes are committing against relatively defenceless peoples are to say the least disgusting. 13 14 Sionnachog Report ploughmanlunch | Pick FreeExpress55 Twitter Reply CheshireSalt RogerPalmer NHSmonami anniegyg jan oskar Hansen Report Thank-you for saying well what I was about to post. Share on LinkedIn Share on Twitter Twitter 4 Nov 2018 20:56 You are a Saudi troll. We being who? MrConservative2016 25 Share on Twitter Share via Email Badchicken1 There’s a difference, Clinton & Obama took money from and rubbed shoulders with Salman the reformer™. Not at all cynical. Reply 14 15 1 2 | Pick Reply Reply Report Nada89 Share on Facebook thehiggsbosenblues 13 14 The Observer view on the ‘cessation of hostilities’ in Yemen Share on Facebook Loading comments… Trouble loading? Share on Facebook Twitter Share on Twitter Share on Twitter | Pick | Pick Report 4 Nov 2018 17:33 Share on Twitter 2 3 4 Nov 2018 18:05 Reply Share FreeExpress55 I doubt nameless people who wrote this article have the slightest clue as to what the war in Yemen is all about, and that it is not even a civil war. Other things they apparently don’t know is the Yemeni army is allied with the Houthis, while the AQAP (al Qaeda) is in alliance with Saudi Arabia. I also think the people who wrote this article are totally unaware of basic geography, if they weren’t, they would know there is no way physically possible for Iran to provide weapons to Houthis, and if they had the slightest ability to search Internet and youtube, they will see the volumes of weapons Houthis and the Yemeni military confiscate from Saudi troops and their allies, that could last them decades. The Yemenis even have the latest batches of Canadian sniper rifles with large stash of ammunitions for them, which they put to good use repelling Saudi troops. What is this article about? Another half hearted feeling sorry for Yemeni and that both sides are bad, kind of explanation. A totally worthless nonsense to make yourself feel good. The Saudi/UAE war on Yemeni people, is based on delusional analysis of US and UK government about protecting Bab al Mandeb, and that China could take control of it, if Yemen is not taken over by Saudi regime under a puppet government. The internal Houthi war since 2002 with the Yemeni government was all about Saudi cultural, religious and economic take over of Yemen. As most of Europe have disdain for Saudi Wahhabism (conveniently called Islamist, jihadist in the west) Yemeni’s have very little tolerance for it as well. Yemenis fight has little to do with global Chinese belt and road and their “control” of transportation of trade bottle necks, so nicely has been under the control of the British and then American empires in the past 200 years. The Yemenis are paying for the western desires to not lose control, while two murderous regime in the world UAE and Saudi have been given the nod to do the dirty work. You want to end this war, tell your governments (US and UK) to stop it, essentially abandon it today, instead of dancing around the issue. But, that is not in the cards. So you folks are responsible as well for hiding the truth. But it was England and USA who planned the rebellion, set it off and supported it. Twitter | Pick Reply 4 Nov 2018 19:08 Share Twitter 10 11 Houthis aren’t a rebel group but a political group. Their allies are the Yemeni Army. Iran is not providing them any help, you need to learn geography. Even if they were the US, UK, Saudi and UAE regimes with Israeli pilots flying Saudi planes, have considerably more fire power. So stop trolling for the Saudi regime. Reply Who is fighting who is secondary. Pick a side of your liking. The problem is that Saudi Arabia is blocking supplies and medicals to help the civilian population. There are 15 million people there! That is the big problem. Looks more like Saudis are planning a genocide, if they want to wipe out the whole population by starving them to death. Maybe go and check whose navy is also blocking international ships from reaching Yemen. It is not the Iranian navy. While Iran is certainly a badarse country, too, the millions of civilian casualties will be the responsibility of Saudi Arabia, the US and the UK. They control most of Yemen, they need to finally open a safe corridor, so that aid can come to the people. Using hunger as a weapon and preventing medical aid in a war is against any international convention. Not that you would expect Saudis to care about that. But UK? US? Hello-oh?! How low have you sunk?! Twitter Share on Facebook Share on Twitter | Pick Reply Facebook Share on Facebook 4 Nov 2018 18:53 Share editorials anything as long as suffering stops What Trump is interested in is preserving America’s military, intelligence and economic relationships with the Saudis and, in particular, with Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman, who is widely believed to have ordered Khashoggi’s murder. Trump has been at pains to shelter Prince Mohammed from the torrent of international condemnation that followed the Istanbul killing. But he could not stop the furore shining a new spotlight on the Saudi leader’s personal responsibility for, among other bad things, the unfolding catastrophe in Yemen. Share on Facebook Share on Facebook Consirder cutting ties with the US War Monger too. Share on Twitter Facebook This comment was removed by a moderator because it didn’t abide by our community standards. Replies may also be deleted. For more detail see our FAQs. Report Facebook Share Share on Facebook 1 2 Report Yemen Facebook Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share | Pick Share on Twitter Read more Share Share on Facebook Facebook I think Houthis should take over Riyadh and make you a manserver, as it is allowed in the ten commandments. Millions of people under starvation in Yemen by your Saudi regime, wake up you lost. Share on Facebook | Pick Absolutely correct, the US Trump represents no longer cares if the world sees that it’s so-called protection of ‘Freedom’ is in fact an undisguised quest for global domination—and always has been. Obama , Bush, Nixon and the rest could hide it— Trump doesn’t even bother. The UK is standing up to him over Iran,it needs to do more. Facebook Share on Twitter | Pick Report 4 Nov 2018 23:54 NHSmonami CheshireSalt 19 20 Are the Houtis rebels? Presumably they are rebelling against something or someone. Is that the current government supported by the US and the Saudi’s? Are they supported by the Iranians? Would your repotting and case not be served better by explaining to us poor mortals why the rebels and Iranians do not have a hand in this guilt dripping saga. Share SomlanderBrit Share Twitter Facebook 31 32 Facebook Reply Report Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Twitter Report Share on Facebook This comment was removed by a moderator because it didn’t abide by our community standards. Replies may also be deleted. For more detail see our FAQs. Opinion Shares4141 SomlanderBrit Twitter Share Twitter Share on Facebook Report Share on Twitter 4 Nov 2018 18:07 Reply Share on Twitter Does Trump know where Yemen is on the map? Does he care about the suffering? Is there a coincidence between his dragging other countries together to pay testimony to the Greatest President Donald J Trump and what is going on in the US Mid Terms? The conversation under the Observer Comment Cartoon is worth a look. Show 1 more reply ‘Nobody in Washington seems to have asked the rebels (or Iran) what they think.’Photograph: Yahya Arhab/EPA 18 19 Twitter Share on Facebook 6 7 | Pick Share on Twitter Reply 11 12 Bet you would you would not say the same about the rebels in Syria? Since you’re here… Share Share on Twitter Report Reply Reply 4 Nov 2018 18:31 Share Facebook Report Share on Twitter 11 12 This comment was removed by a moderator because it didn’t abide by our community standards. Replies may also be deleted. For more detail see our FAQs. Twitter Share 4 5 4 5 Share on Twitter 11 12 | Pick Facebook | Pick Reply 4 Nov 2018 18:47 Share Share on Facebook Share Twitter Share on Facebook Donald Trump … we have a small favour to ask. The Guardian will engage with the most critical issues of our time – from the escalating climate catastrophe to widespread inequality to the influence of big tech on our lives. At a time when factual information is a necessity, we believe that each of us, around the world, deserves access to accurate reporting with integrity at its heart.More people are reading and supporting The Guardian’s independent, investigative journalism than ever before. And unlike many news organisations, we have chosen an approach that allows us to keep our journalism accessible to all, regardless of where they live or what they can afford. But we need your ongoing support to keep working as we do.Our editorial independence means we set our own agenda and voice our own opinions. Guardian journalism is free from commercial and political bias and not influenced by billionaire owners or shareholders. This means we can give a voice to those less heard, explore where others turn away, and rigorously challenge those in power.We need your support to keep delivering quality journalism, to maintain our openness and to protect our precious independence. Every reader contribution, big or small, is so valuable. Support The Guardian from as little as $1 – and it only takes a minute. Thank you. Twitter | Pick 8 9 Twitter | Pick Report 4 Nov 2018 23:06 | Pick Report Report Bang on…….. Saudi Arabia financed the rebellion in Syria as well. Share on Twitter 4 Nov 2018 19:16 ‘Not the case. Neither Saudi nor the Emiratis have ever attacked a third country before the Houthi misadventure in Yemen.’ Bankrolling ISIS and Al Qaeda to attack other countries on the behalf of the Saudi’s is despicable and cowardly. Share on Twitter TINA – there is no alternative. Share Sign in or create your Guardian account to recommend a comment 4 Nov 2018 18:04 Reuse this content,View all comments > Report Report Facebook | Pick Twitter Share on Twitter | Pick Share on Twitter Hafiz Farook FreeExpress55 5 Nov 2018 1:30 Share on Facebook 11 12 ‘End war on Yemen’s children’: conflict escalates around Hodeidah hospital ploughmanlunch Reply Facebook Bathreader Share on Facebook Facebook Share on Twitter Share Saudi Arabia Guardian Today: the headlines, the analysis, the debate – sent direct to you Lastly, no one can defend MBS over Khashoggi affair. It was a horrific and unforgivable act of brutality (as well as horrendous political miscalculation) if he indeed ordered the murder of Mr Khashoggi. But we mustn’t conflate this with the legal and I would say just war in Yemen or jeopardise his herculean attempt at reforming Wahabbism and saving Sunnidom and perhaps the world from its tyrannical fundamentalism. He is Sunnidom’s last hope before it all sinks into the abyss of Wahabbi Salfi medievalism. He is emerging as Sunnidom’s Martin Luther (and some will say Henry The Fat) in one. SomlanderBrit Twitter Authoritative reports from Washington last week suggest the US has now decided to stick by Prince Mohammed despite the Khashoggi affair. There will be no real punishment. Why? Because Trump needs Saudi support for his destabilisation campaign against Iran, which intensifies on Monday with the imposition of a global oil embargo. Trump sees Prince Mohammed as a key ally, along with Israel, the UAE and Egypt’s dictator, Abdel Fatah al-Sisi, in effecting regime change in Tehran. He also wants to maintain bilateral co-operation on Islamist terrorism, a Syrian postwar settlement, and lucrative arms sales.But Trump is under growing bipartisan pressure in Congress over the humanitarian disaster in Yemen, for which the Saudis are primarily blamed. Proposed legislation would limit or halt future arms transfers as long as fighting continues. There are also parallel moves to sanction the Saudi regime over the Istanbul murder. So how best to head off the critics, bury the Khashoggi affair and move on? You’ve got it. Switch the focus to Yemen, call a halt to an unpopular war you hitherto ignored and, it’s hoped, regain lost moral ground.The problems with this cynical approach are numerous and possibly fatal. In their haste to rescue their Saudi client, Trump’s officials do not appear to have consulted, in advance, allies such as Britain. Nobody in Washington seems to have asked the rebels (or Iran) what they think. The US is insisting that, before Saudi bombing stops, the Houthis must first halt their missile attacks, an unrealistic precondition. And it is not even proposing a formal ceasefire, merely an initial “cessation of hostilities”, an altogether different, flimsier idea. Why has it taken so long for the Trump administration to act[?] Share on Facebook 4 Nov 2018 22:43 Share on Twitter 18 19 4 Nov 2018 23:22 Reply What Trump is interested in is preserving America’s military, intelligence and economic relationships with the Saudis Share on Twitter Reply Seymour Pratt Facebook Facebook juster 7 8 No you are totally wrong on all points. Internationally, the Saudi/UAE regimes are aggressive regimes. Under international law and duty to protect, any UN member state can attack the Saudi regime to end this aggression. Besides that, the presidential term for Hadi had expired and after the take over of the capital by the Yemeni Army and Houthis, he voluntarily resigned. Houthis with Yemeni military moved quickly to unify the country and kick al Qaeda out back to Saudi Arabia. Much of their fights weren’t even fights, with little bloodshed. Besides, I don’t think you are from Yemen. But a Saudi troll. lionfood Share on Facebook Twitter Facebook This comment was removed by a moderator because it didn’t abide by our community standards. Replies may also be deleted. For more detail see our FAQs. Reply Reason (optional) Facebook MicheNorman Facebook I think “rebellion” is more accurate, insurrection more accurate still but proxy invasion most accurate. | Pick Share Share on Facebook 4 Nov 2018 17:29 Share on Twitter | Pick Twitter Report uncommodified Please select Personal abuse Off topic Legal issue Trolling Hate speech Offensive/Threatening language Copyright Spam Other Twitter As we said at the start, any halt to the violence in Yemen would be welcome and overdue. But launching into a hazardous peace process for the wrong reasons, on a flawed basis, without proper preparation, in order to serve extraneous, selfish and highly objectionable political ends, invites failure – and may very possibly make matters worse. The UN’s special envoy, Martin Griffiths, now has the unenviable task of implementing the American initiative. We must hope, in the first instance, that the Saudis desist from a new offensive on the besieged port of Hodeidah in the 30 days before the cessation supposedly begins. Reply Share on Facebook | Pick Share on Twitter Reply Twitter Share on Twitter Share on Facebook prairdog | Pick Facebook Share This comment was removed by a moderator because it didn’t abide by our community standards. Replies may also be deleted. For more detail see our FAQs. Sorry there was an error. Please try again later. If the problem persists, please contact Userhelp Share on Messenger Facebook The moment that Iran chose to interest itself in Yemen’s affairs there could be no good outcome. Facebook | Pick Threads collapsed 4 Nov 2018 23:08 anyonelistening 4 Nov 2018 20:56 Show 4 more replies anniegyg Report Share Show 1 more reply Facebook 4 Nov 2018 21:54 4 Nov 2018 20:04 | Pick sksmith1000 balancedtrue | Pick SomlanderBrit Share Share Share Share on Facebook FreeExpress55 Share on Twitter | Pick 5 6 Report Report 23 24 4 Nov 2018 23:09 Report | Pick Share on Twitter Facebook FreeExpress55 And why did the Obama administration and its Western European allies think that the Saudi intervention was a good idea in the first place? Twitter Share via Email Share on Facebook Facebook Report 4 Nov 2018 18:00 Facebook Email (optional) 4 Nov 2018 23:28 Reply 12 13 Report I think this is a pretty warped perspective – the whole “Iran are taking over Yemen!” thing is Saudi propaganda, created because in the paranoid minds of the Sauds, all Shia are Iranian agents. 4 Nov 2018 17:41 | Pick Report SomlanderBrit Share on Twitter Sun 4 Nov 2018 01.00 EST Facebook FreeExpress55 | Pick Twitter Share on Facebook Topics Share Share Report lionfood 5 Nov 2018 1:18 Facebook Twitter 6 7 Reply Twitter Netinyahu, with his buddy Trump are trying to cast Iran as the ” Big danger ” and the Saudis as the country of ” hope and good sense”. It did not need the brutal murder of Khashoghi to show the real face of the Saudis, that has been evident to all but those on the Saudi payroll.As for Iran,it does not pose any real threat to Israel,nor does Hamas or Hezbollah. All these forces are just symbolic and pose little threat to Israel, except in the world of public opinion. And Israel is losing in the world of public opinion.Any sensible major power must see the potential of Iran, despite many reasons to criticise that country. The Saudis, on the other hand, have only lots of oil and money, but it is doubtful if they will make much progress, other than attracting money and building huge projects.Every step towards the 21st century in Saudi Arabia will be painfully slow. You cannot buy culture. Share 3 4 Share on Facebook 4 5 oldest 4 Nov 2018 22:01 5 Nov 2018 1:43 5 Nov 2018 23:09 Report Sionnachog Facebook 4 5 uncommodified I grovel before your illustrious wisdom and greatness your highness | Pick Reply | Pick emiliofloris Share on Twitter I don’t think that May will be putting on much pressure as she will have pressure from Israel who naturally very happy with Trump. Report Twitter The moment that Iran chose to interest itself in Yemen’s affairs there could be no good outcome. Saudi Arabia is many things, none of them good but there is no way it was going to allow an Iran-backed failed state on its borders. Our interest is to keep well out of the way and let the Saudis do what they are going to do anyway. That sounds highly cynical and immoral but will save civilian lives in the end. Just as in Syria there is no point in backing rebel forces that will be worse than the incumbents should they ever achieve power. | Pick CheshireSalt SomlanderBrit Share on Twitter 4 Nov 2018 21:59 Share And why has Britain not acted? Why does Britain still sell arms to the Saudis? Arms which we know will be used against Yemeni people!! 4 Nov 2018 21:51 lizidrip Don’t blame the media. That’s Trumps territory. There has been coverage of the war in Yemen, whether enough is a question no one can answer. Putin also likes to target the media. As does the Crown Prince. Share Share on Twitter Share on Facebook 4 Nov 2018 17:31 2 3 Reply Support The Guardian Twitter Share on Facebook Twitter Share on Facebook Show 1 more reply Facebook Facebook imperium3 PatriotPete Bathreader Share Share on Twitter 5 Nov 2018 2:12 Share 1 Seymour Pratt Share on Twitter 9 10 Observer editorial SomlanderBrit | Pick Facebook SomlanderBrit Report Evil regime in Iraq plus oil gone.Evil regime in Saudi Arabia plus oil still ‘ere. just sayin’… 4 Nov 2018 23:19 Report Share on Twitter Reply Pathetic attempt at obfuscation. Iranians may have exploited the conflict (like arms selling Brits, Americans and the Eu, but the Saudis are starving 15+ million people. Share on Facebook Report 4 Nov 2018 17:39 Share Twitter 0 1 Reply NHSmonami 8 9 Facebook Facebook Share on Twitter 12 13 Facebook Maybe they’ll stop fighting if the Saudis stop bombing and starving them. SomlanderBrit SomlanderBrit 4 Nov 2018 22:57 Down2dirt Share Reply Share memeroots Facebook Reply Share on Twitter 4 Nov 2018 22:05 People in Sana’a or in Aden? I guess you know how they all feel and who they blame. I’m sure however that they, unlike you, don’t really have a nice opinion of MBS and the Saudis. ID5996032 Share on Twitter Share on Twitter Report But it hasn’t been well documented, has it? Anything but in fact. This appalling one-sided ‘war’ has been conducted with the connivance of a criminally silent main stream media. Perhaps the only mainstream correspondents regularly visiting the situation in Yemen have been Patrick Cockburn and, to a lesser extent, Robert Fisk. For the rest, the war might has well have been taking place on Mars. This whole episode makes me sick. We trade arms with a genocidal despot, and only even think about criticising them when it looks like we might lose face because they murdered one single journalist. We shouldnt be seeking a UN resolution now. We should be cutting all diplomatic and trade ties, like we should have done decades ago. 18 19 Share on Twitter Show 1 more reply 4 Nov 2018 23:42 Twitter comments (108)Sign in or create your Guardian account to join the discussion. Seymour Pratt | Pick | Pick 5 Nov 2018 15:11 Twitter Twitter Share 100 unthreaded I agree, and would like to see the saudi and Iranian masters been tried in the Hague for crimes against humanity along with the UK and USA government leaders. For me that the fact that the UK is continuing to support the Saudi’s and continue to supply them with arms is immoral and unsupportable and shames the entire UK, Its no good saying that if the UK does not sell them arms then someone else will, others like the USA are already as guilty of supporting mass murder as the UK is.Humanity is far more important than greed and religious bigotry I have to say that I believe that prince mohammed is evil as are the governments supporting not only the sale of arms, but also doing nothing about saudi blocking help going to the Yemini with food , medical aid etc in much the same way as a mass murderer of children is evil. Twitter Last modified on Mon 5 Nov 2018 11.52 EST 4 Nov 2018 17:47 5 Nov 2018 1:54 FreeExpress55 newest 3 4 13 14 Reply ” Internationally, the Saudi/UAE regimes are aggressive regimes.” Not the case. Neither Saudi nor the Emiratis have ever attacked a third country before the Houthi misadventure in Yemen. “Under international law and duty to protect, any UN member state can attack the Saudi regime to end this aggression” The UN approved this war. Which makes it perfectly legal under international law. “Besides that, the presidential term for Hadi had expired and after the take over of the capital by the Yemeni Army and Houthis, he voluntarily resigned.” Simply untrue sir. Besides an ending of a democratic president’s tenure should not be followed by a military takeover but by democratic elections. That is how things are supposed to work at any rate.. “Houthis with Yemeni military moved quickly to unify the country and kick al Qaeda out back to Saudi Arabia.” That is not how things were seen in Aden, Hadhramut, Abyan, Mukallah, Khor Maksr and Crater. Not even In Taiz. On the contrary it was seen as a hostile invasion by the Ziyoud. It was unfair and unjust and unwise act of utter irresponsibility. The poor people of Yemen are paying the price. “Much of their fights weren’t even fights, with little bloodshed.” There is some truth in this. It was a blitzkrieg by the Houthis so they took most areas with hardly any resistance. “I don’t think you are from Yemen” I never claimed to be. “But a Saudi troll.” The emperor of China is more Saudi than I. Share Badchicken1 9 10 Twitter Reply Report Reply “Authoritative reports from Washington last week suggest the US has now decided to stick by Prince Mohammed despite the Khashoggi affair.” – hardly surprising: there is literally no right wing regime extreme enough to alienate US support providing they are compliant with US corporate interests. In other words the US are the primary financial backers of fascism and the current generation of US leaders are the worst in living memory, especially swivel-eyed neocons like John Boulton and Jeff Sessions. Reply 30 31 Share on Pinterest Twitter Share on Facebook 4 Nov 2018 22:00 Report Reply 13 14 Facebook | Pick The onus is on the Iran-backed crazies a.k.a. ‘Houthis’ to stop bombing the real Yemeni government led by President Abdrabbuh Mansur Hadi Share on Twitter | Pick 4 Nov 2018 21:21 4 Nov 2018 18:42 Reply sksmith1000 4 Nov 2018 17:43 Trump is an Intellectually Challenged Lout which compounded with the fact few Muslim states understand the need to separate state and religion because of the historic conflict it generates amongst human beings and you have a recipe for continued world disfunction including much death and injury. Facebook Reply 21 22 Reply View more comments FreeExpress55 Twitter ID5996032 Show 25 Share on Facebook Share NHSmonami Report Reply Facebook MrConservative2016 FreeExpress55 Close report comment form Reply Share uncommodified Share on Facebook Share on Facebook Share on Twitterlast_img read more