Remembering

first_imgBy Dialogo July 01, 2012 An Army tank carries children in 1998 during a tour of the northern city of San Pedro Sula, Honduras, marking the birth of the Central American independence hero, Francisco Morazán. Morazán was president of the United Provinces of Central America from 1830 to 1840 and was considered a military and political hero. He was born in Honduras on October 3, 1792, and was executed by a firing squad in San José, Costa Rica, on September 15, 1842, after he led forces in a failed attempt to restore the federation.last_img

Sadio Mane sinks Norwich City as Liverpool go 25 points clear

first_imgLONDON: Liverpool’s Sadio Mane marked his return from injury with a late goal to break Norwich City’s resistance and secure a 1-0 win on Saturday to extend his side’s Premier League lead to 25 points.On a windy evening, bottom club Norwich was proving a tough nut to crack for Juergen Klopp’s team but Senegalese forward Mane, who came on as a substitute on the hour, pounced to drill home a fine finish from inside the area in the 78th minute.It was his first appearance since going off injured in Liverpool’s win at Wolverhampton Wanderers on Jan. 23 and he marked it by claiming the 100th goal in English football.A battling Norwich had defended resolutely and twice came close to taking the lead, but Liverpool’s relentless romp towards a first English title for 30 years continued.The victory was their 34th in their last 35 league games and their 17th in succession, one shy of Manchester City’s record.They have scored in 35 successive Premier League games, are unbeaten in their last 43 and have conceded only once in their last 11 league games.Fifteen more points will guarantee them the title as they have collected 76 points out of a possible 78, now 25 ahead of Manchester City, who have played a game less.“It was a difficult game for different reasons,” Klopp said. “The wind, the organization of the opponent and the way we played in the first half made it tricky for us.“Sadio was fresh and made the difference.”Norwich, for whom Alexander Tettey struck the woodwork in the second half, remain seven points adrift of 17th-placed Aston Villa who hosts Tottenham Hotspur on Sunday.They battled until the end, however, and Teemu Pukki fired straight at Alisson in the 89th minute after a flowing move.Liverpool began the match 55 points ahead of Norwich, the biggest ever gap between top and bottom after 25 games in the Premier League, but lacked their usual cutting edge.They enjoyed overwhelming territorial superiority in the first half with Trent Alexander-Arnold especially dangerous in the wide-open spaces down the right flank.Yet Liverpool struggled to create clear-cut chances and it was Norwich who should have taken the lead when Lukas Rupp was picked out by a long ball with the visiting defense nowhere, having pushed up for offside.The second half was a Liverpool siege with keeper Tim Krul saving Norwich several times. The Dutchman produced a fingertip save to keep out Naby Keita’s powerful effort than a magnificent double stop to deny Mohamed Salah and Keita again.Norwich’s excursions into Liverpool territory were few and far between but one ended with Tettey’s slightly miscued effort thudding against Alisson’s near post.It was Mane, on for Alex Oxlade-Chamberlain, who eventually broke the deadlock with a superb finish.Bringing down Jordan Henderson’s flighted pass with his outstretched right leg, he then swiveled and crashed a low shot with his left foot past the helpless Krul.There was a suspicion that Mane had pushed a marker as he brought the ball down, but VAR ruled in his favour.With the title virtually assured, Liverpool turns their attention to their defense of the Champions League on Tuesday when they visit Atletico Madrid at the Wanda Metropolitano stadium, scene of their triumph in the final last season.Vydra stunner gives Burnley win at SouthamptonMatej Vydra’s stunning strike earned Burnley a 2-1 victory at Southampton to move them into the top half of the Premier League table on a wet and wild Saturday at St Mary’s Stadium.The Czech player, who replaced injured Burnley striker Chris Wood midway through the opening half, had hardly had a sniff of goal but produced a dazzling finish on the hour.It was a sickener for Southampton, who had looked the more likely winners after former Burnley player Danny Ings had equalized in the 18th minute with his 15th goal of the season.Burnley had taken the lead in the second minute with a bizarre curled goal straight from a corner taken by Ashley Westwood.Vydra won it when he chested the ball down on the edge of the area and edged it past a Southampton defender before stretching to crash a left-foot shot past keeper Alex McCarthy.Burnley hung on relatively comfortably as Southampton struggled to create much in a strengthening wind.A third win in their last four league games lifted Burnley into 10th place with 34 points from 26 games, while Southampton remained in 13th place on 31 points. AgenciesAlso Read: Liverpool’s Sadio Mane is African Footballer of the YearAlso Watch: Assam Petro-Chemicals Ltd vice chairman speaks to The Sentinel Digitallast_img read more

The Coach of Nigeria’s Basketball Team is From…Vermont

first_img*How a former college soccer player ended up in the Olympic basketball arenaWill Voigt grew up in Vermont, played college soccer in California and moved to Idaho earlier this summer. But he hasn’t been home much since then, and he won’t be until after the Olympics. He’s been too busy working: Will Voigt is the coach of the Nigerian men’s national basketball team.This is more than the most unexpected job of Voigt’s career. It may be the most unusual marriage of any coach and any country in the entire Olympic Games. “What are the odds,” said Fran Voigt, his father, “that a little white guy from a little town in Vermont who never played college or professional ball would be selected to coach the Nigerian team?”The odds of Nigeria winning a medal in Rio de Janeiro next month might be even longer. That would be the single biggest shocker in the history of Olympic basketball. As the lowest-ranked team, Nigeria’s goal is to become the first African country ever to get into the knockout round, and they’re aware of how improbable that sounds. “Obviously,” said captain Ike Diogu, “nobody believes we can come out of our group.”That they’re even playing in the Olympics is almost as remarkable as how the Nigerians ended up with a 39-year-old, soft-spoken, baby-faced American as their coach. This has been Voigt’s full-time job for the last year, and every day he asks himself the obvious existential question: “How the heck did I end up here?”It’s a wild story that continues in Rio after multiple stops in basketball hinterlands on several continents. And it began in a town that was rural even for Vermont. Voigt grew up on what used to be a dairy farm in Cabot, where he was one of 18 kids in the graduating class of his tiny high school, which was one of the smallest in the state. “There were more cows than people,” said his former coach Steve Pratt.Still, people in Cabot sensed that Voigt would do something interesting with his life in part because of who his parents are. His father, Fran Voigt, founded the New England Culinary Institute. His mother, Ellen Bryant Voigt, was Vermont’s poet laureate and won a MacArthur genius fellowship last year for her poetry. “The gene pool,” said his father, “would not have anticipated this.”Voigt went to Pomona College, a Division III school in California, where he played on the soccer team. His parents can still remember their response when they asked what he would major in and he told them he wanted to be a basketball coach: “Say what?” Fran Voigt said.But he once explained to his mother why he wanted to coach basketball rather than the other sports he played. “He was always interested in the strategy,” Ellen Bryant Voigt said. “He was the point guard on the basketball team, the catcher on the baseball team and the center striker on the soccer team. He wanted to be right in the thick of it and make strategic decisions—which clearly you can do and need to do in a basketball game.”Voigt’s surprising career in professional basketball began with an internship with the Los Angeles Clippers. It stalled during the 1999 NBA lockout, so he worked for a data-warehousing company. It continued with the Clippers when the lockout ended—but he still kept the job with the data-warehousing company.Then he moved to San Antonio to be video coordinator for the Spurs. At the time, the Spurs’ front office was stocked with future coaches and general managers, and many of them had peculiar backgrounds. Voigt’s was the most unexpected of them all.“It’s like me wanting to be a water-polo player,” said Spurs coach Gregg Popovich.Voigt soaked up Popovich’s wisdom—but not only at work. They were roommates, too. Voigt found himself in need of a place to stay in the middle of the NBA season, and Popovich let him crash in his guest room for a month.He moved out, left the Spurs in 2001 and soon became a basketball nomad. For his first head-coaching job, Voigt went to Norway for what he thought would be a week. It turned out to be three years. He was lured back to the U.S. for a magical run with a semi-pro team called the Vermont Frost Heaves that was founded by Sports Illustrated writer Alexander Wolff. He later relocated to China for a job with the Shanxi Brave Dragons.Voigt is now coaching Nigeria in part because of that peripatetic career. He coached the Bakersfield Jam in the NBA’s D-League from 2009 to 2014—the longest Voigt has stayed in one place since college—and had key Nigerian national players on his teams there.But even before then, Voigt became friends with Masai Ujiri, the Nigerian-born general manager of the Toronto Raptors. When Ujiri began setting up basketball camps in his native country, Voigt was one of the first volunteers. He worked camps in Zaria, Abuja and Lagos and impressed Ujiri by venturing to smaller cities hours away on his off days. “A lot of people ask a hundred questions,” Ujiri said, “which you’re supposed to do.” Voigt didn’t. “Will was just, like, ‘Let’s go,’” he said. “He’s one of those explorer types.”For all the rules in Olympic sports, there are none that govern the nationality of coaches, and the result is a lot of arrangements that make as much sense as the coach of Nigeria being from Vermont. It’s one of the strange realities of every Olympics that gets overshadowed by the spectacular theatrics on fields and courts, on the track and in the water: If you look away from the action, you find people whose paths to the Olympics were incredible in their own right.Voigt had been to Nigeria before and has been to Nigeria since, but the country’s basketball officials came to Dallas to interview him last year. He was offered the job in June. Olympic qualifying began in August. His contract ran through September. That meant Nigeria had to win the continental tournament known as AfroBasket or it would almost certainly have another new coach—and Nigeria had never before won AfroBasket.Africa typically only gets one basketball team in the Olympics. That team is usually Angola, which opened the Barcelona Games with a nightmarish loss to the Dream Team. The few people who remember the Nigerians’ first Olympic appearance in 2012 might recall them the same way. “When you think about us,” Diogu said, “all you think about is us losing to the USA by 80 points.” It was actually 83 points: Team USA won, 156-73, in the most lopsided Olympic basketball game of all time.But last summer, with Ujiri watching from a bar in Senegal and Voigt’s parents streaming the games on a computer in Vermont, Voigt and the Nigerians beat out 15 other nations for Africa’s automatic Olympic entry. One of his trips to Nigeria since then was for a celebration at Aso Villa—the country’s White House.Voigt’s job is part coach, part general manager. He cobbled together a coaching staff from Nigeria, Norway, and the NBA. He constructed a roster with current NBA players like Al-Farouq Aminu and Michael Gbinije and notable college players who are now scattered around the world. Then he had to figure out how they should play. Nigeria still plans to run and press, but Voigt wants the team to be more efficient in the halfcourt, too. “In the past, people would look at African teams and say they’re athletic, but they have no discipline and play wild,” said Voigt, wearing a Nigeria green polo shirt and matching G-Shock watch. “We’ve really worked hard to change that. That was our approach at AfroBasket, and that’s our approach for Rio.”There are 12 nations playing Olympic men’s basketball, and Voigt has the Nigerians convinced they could be one of the eight that get out of the group round. In the last two Olympics, no team ranked lower than No. 20 survived the group stage, and Nigeria enters the Olympics ranked 25th in the world. But it’s not impossible. Last week, in fact, Nigeria beat No. 4 Argentina.“This is not the Jamaican bobsled team,” Voigt said as he munched on a turkey sandwich afterward.But the difference between the Nigerian and U.S. teams is roughly equivalent to the difference between basketball and badminton. One day last week, Nigeria rolled into practice riding 15-seater vans. Team USA walked off Wi-Fi-enabled luxury buses to hundreds of fans waiting in oppressive heat for their autographs.Next week, Nigeria will play the U.S. in its last Olympic tuneup, a matchup of the only American head men’s basketball coaches in Rio: Voigt and Mike Krzyzewski. One of them has been a coach longer than the other has been alive.That game will begin like other U.S. and Nigeria games: with “The Star-Spangled Banner” and “Arise, O Compatriots.” Voigt’s parents were delighted last year by what happened after AfroBasket’s final buzzer. Nigeria’s players lifted Voigt in the air, climbed the podium and, with iPhones in their hands and medals around their necks, belted out their country’s national anthem. Voigt knew every word.“We’re going to sing the anthem with pride,” he said, “and I do.”Share this:FacebookRedditTwitterPrintPinterestEmailWhatsAppSkypeLinkedInTumblrPocketTelegramlast_img read more

Cleveland Browns set to appoint 7th coach since 2009 after sacking Freddie Kitchens

first_img Colin DCunha SUBSCRIBE TO US First Published: 30th December, 2019 18:50 IST COMMENT Freddie Kitchens has been relieved of his duties as head coach📰 » https://t.co/1xJHLKsP0N pic.twitter.com/iCsqnlDeDV— Cleveland Browns (@Browns) December 30, 2019 Written By “We thank Freddie for his hard work and commitment to this organization but did not see the success or opportunities for improvement to move forward with him as our head coach. Our focus is on hiring an exceptional leader for this football team and we will take a comprehensive approach to this process. We are excited about the core players we have to build around and develop and we look forward to bringing in a strong head coach that will put this group of players in the best position to succeed.” – Statement from Browns owners Jimmy and Dee Haslam  Statement from Dee and Jimmy Haslam: pic.twitter.com/eJKFT2nCPo— Cleveland Browns (@Browns) December 30, 2019 WATCH US LIVE Last Updated: 30th December, 2019 18:50 IST Cleveland Browns Set To Appoint 7th Coach Since 2009 After Sacking Freddie Kitchens Freddie Kitchens was relieved of his duties as head coach of the Cleveland Browns. The Browns fell to a defeat in their last game in the NFL this season. The Freddie Kitchens experiment has drawn to a close after just one season, the Cleveland Browns announced on Sunday night. Freddie Kitchens follows Eric Mangini, Pat Shurmur, Rob Chudzinski, Mike Pettine and Hue Jackson out of the door when it comes to the Browns. With Kitchens fired, the Browns will now be looking to hire their seventh coach since 2009. Also Read | Odell Beckham Jr Moving Away From Cleveland Browns? Patriots Trade Rumours Circle NFLNFL: Cleveland Browns fire Freddie Kitchens after disastrous one-year spell Also Read | Browns’ Landry Says Hip Pain Caused By Fractured Vertebrae The Browns have faced disciplinary issues both on and off the field in the National Football League (NFL) this season. First, there was the Myles Garrett issue, which was then followed by weeks of speculation regarding Odell Beckham Jr’s future with the Browns. Freddie Kitchens also failed to develop the talent of Baker Mayfield. In fact, Mayfield’s numbers have taken a hit since his rookie season. Also Read | Odell Beckham Jr Throws Helmet In Anger, Argues With Browns Coach Freddie KitchensThe Cleveland Browns went 6-10 in the NFL this season. Their final game of the season also ended in defeat as the Cincinnati Bengals prevailed over the Cleveland Browns at the Paul Brown Stadium on Saturday night. The Bengals have one of the worst records in the NFL this season. The win over the Cleveland Browns was only their second win this year. Interestingly, Freddie Kitchens became just the second coach in the history of the Cleveland Browns (Rob Chudzinski in 2013) to be fired after just one year in charge.Also Read | Odell Beckham Jr Addresses Helmet-throwing Incident Against The Baltimore Ravens LIVE TV FOLLOW USlast_img read more