49ers’ Richard Sherman despises Thursday Night Football

first_imgSANTA CLARA — 49ers cornerback Richard Sherman will suit up and start on Thursday night against the Cardinals in Arizona, but he’d rather not.Sherman, an outspoken critic of Thursday Night Football, doesn’t believe his teammates or opponents should be subjected to playing in the middle of the week.“Guys coming off Sunday games, sometimes Sunday night games, playing on Thursday is still just a terrible turnaround,” Sherman said Tuesday. “Guys have gotten it done and obviously guys have …last_img

Injecting confidence in SA

first_imgThe GCIS’s Themba Maseko spoke about changing perceptions that South Africans are xenophobic. The LOC’s Tim Modise urged delegates to be bold when telling the African story. Minister in the Presidents office Dr. Essop Pahad challenged local media to engage in fact-based journalism. Dr. Irvin Khoza spoke passionately about The unifying power of soccer.Khanyi MagubaneThe importance of portraying South Africa and the rest of the continent in a positive light ahead of the 2010 Fifa World Cup was the focus of the third 2010 National Communications Partnership Conference, recently held in Sandton, Johannesburg.Over 500 delegates attended the two-day meeting on 29 and 30 July 2008, aimed at empowering the media, public relations officers, government communicators and public to use every opportunity to show the world South Africa is ready to host a quality World Cup.When, on 15 May 2004 the 2010 World Cup host country was announced, President Thabo Mbeki promised the world South Africa would host the most successful tournament ever, saying, “We want to stage an event that will send ripples of confidence from Cape to Cairo.“We want to ensure that one day historians will reflect upon the 2010 Fifa World Cup as a moment when Africa stood tall and resolutely turned the tide on centuries of poverty and conflict,” he said.However, getting this message across in the run-up to 2010 is the challenge faced by stakeholders, especially in light of negative publicity on South Africa’s ability to deliver on its promises.The conference hosted speakers from key sectors involved in the organisation of the World Cup, including government, the 2010 local organising committee, police and security, as well as 2006 Fifa World Cup hosts, Germany.Co-chairperson of the National Communication Partnership, Nkwenkwe Nkomo, said the conference enabled African communicators to exchange ideas and practical suggestions on how to project a positive image of Africa to the world, using opportunities presented by the upcoming World Cup.“We wanted to achieve a coherent and action-oriented plan. The conference was also a way to build African solidarity and foster a climate that contributes to African growth and development,” he said.Role of SA mediaThe keynote address, delivered by Minister in The Presidency Dr Essop Pahad, placed emphasis on the responsibility of the local media to ensure the right messages are sent out to international audiences.“We see the hosting of the 2010 Fifa World Cup as an opportunity to demonstrate to the world the positive socio-economic developments in our country, our region and our continent. We are confident that global perceptions of Africa and South Africa will change in the run-up to 2010,” he said, adding that communicators needed to embark on a large-scale campaign to “highlight and accentuate the positive” without defending the shortcomings in preparations and in meeting deadlines.Pahad also challenged the South African media on the negative World Cup coverage from overseas. “Given the power of the media to shape perceptions we need to ask whether the media in our country has the capacity and independence of mind to question news items about our state of readiness which emanate from Reuters, the BBC and so on.”He tackled what he described as the tendency of South African media to simply perpetuate World Cup pessimism coming from international media. “We are aware that negative stories will, from time to time, emerge in the international media. But the critical question is will the media in South Africa simply parrot those stories or will they be discerning and dig beneath and undertake a critical analysis of what is being said?“This is not by way of saying that the media in South Africa ought not to be critical of shortcomings in our preparations – they must be critical, for in their responsible reporting they assist us as well.”Football’s mega reachChairperson of the local organising committee and owner of Orlando Pirates football club, Dr Irvin Khoza, spoke of the unifying power of football at the conference.Khoza assured delegates that South Africa was going to stage an event that would show the ability of sport to cut through race, class, cultures and language.According to Khoza, there are 1.2-billion people around the world connected to football in some way – from the players on the field, administrators, commentators, sports journalists and the fans. He says the sport has a way of connecting and uniting people, describing it as the “superior reach” of football.Khoza noted that in South Africa the Soweto Derby, an annual clash between two of South Africa’s biggest football teams – Kaiser Chiefs and Orlando Pirates, draws more television audiences than prime time news.He encouraged the media to shape a clear message to the world that South Africa is going to use the unifying power of soccer to stage a memorable event for all.City Press newspaper editor Kathu Mamaila called for the media to exercise responsible journalism. He asked: “What is it about us that we want the world to know and how do we become the information leaders when it comes to telling the world about the process of organising the World Cup?” He also discussed his thoughts on who South Africans are as a peopleMamaila encouraged journalists not to be extremist in their reporting, whether their bent was positive or negative. He said the role of the media was not to take a “see no evil, hear no evil” approach when it came to reporting matters on the World Cup.Echoing minister Pahad’s message, Mamaila said journalists should rather exercise responsible, objective, fact-based journalism. This, he said, could be achieved by reporting on all the shortcomings as they occur, but also by highlighting all the developments taking place.From glum to gleeDr Nikolaus Eberl, of the Nation of Champions initiative, gave delegates a picture of how Germany changed the way the world perceived it, by using powerful messages to tell a different story about the Germans ahead of the 2006 World Cup.“Two years before the World Cup, he said, things were not going well. Germans were described as a collectively depressed people, unemployment figures were at their highest, everything seemed to be going wrong.”His challenge was to find something within Germans that would unite them, cause them to turn their misery around and focus on what it meant to be German, but most importantly, prepare them for a prestigious world event in their home country.Eberl’s solution was to teach Germans that they were worth something. The campaign was called “From grumpy to happy” and images of smiling faces were seen on printed t-shirts worn by Germans during a series of organised outdoor concerts. This campaign presented the opportunity for communicators to convey the message to Germans that they were okay, that they had something to offer the world.Using positive representations was very crucial, Eberl said at the conference. He spoke of the power of the image of former president Nelson Mandela’s image as well as other African icons like Archbishop emeritus Desmond Tutu, Kenyan Nobel Peace Price winner Wangari Mathai, President Thabo Mbeki and liberation movement stalwarts like Walter Sisulu.Eberl assured South Africa that it had the potential to send across a powerful message of not only South Africa’s but Africa’s readiness to receive the world.His views were echoed by Themba Maseko, CEO of government’s communications arm, GCIS. Maseko addressed the recent xenophobic attacks on foreigners in South Africa and the negative perception of the country.He said it was important for the media to bring across the message that South Africa was ready to receive the world. “Xenophobia undermines the freedom that our fellow Africans will have [when attending the World Cup]. We must rally behind all African teams, as this will be an African World Cup.”He added that it was government’s intention to unite Africans through sport and that the World Cup was the perfect opportunity to do so.Selling Africa to the worldTim Modise, the local organising committee’s chief communications and marketing officer for 2010, pointed out that it’s crucial to highlight that South Africa is also ready to host the Fifa Confederations Cup in 2009.Modise stressed the importance of setting the agenda and using both sport and non-sporting events around the world to market the continent. He gave examples of the World Travel Market, which brings together different countries showcasing what they have to offer, and the 2008 African Cup of Nations held in Ghana earlier in 2008.Peter Mutie, chairperson of the Public Relations Society of Kenya, made the point that Africans should not sit back and be spectators as far as the image of Africa is concerned, but that Africa should use the opportunity afforded to it like the World Cup, to shape the world’s perceptions.Mutie emphasised five points that needed to be highlighted – he said that Africans were vibrant, energetic, capable, warm and the continent was “the place to be”. He said it must be stressed that African governments were committed to political stability, that Africa was competent and that it had the ability to draw people from across the social spectrum.Margaret Dingalo, chair of the marketing and communications cluster in the 2010 National Communication Partnership, made the point that Africa needed to sell as a holistic brand, and be positioned as a world leader. This, Dingalo said, would involve every country on the continent working on its image to show the world its real face.Useful linksBrand South AfricaThe movement for GoodGCISDr. Nikolaus EberlCity PressDo you have any queries or comments about this article? Email Khanyi Magubane at [email protected]last_img read more

South Africa gains from global energy expertise

first_imgThe Department of Energy hopes its partnership with the International Energy Agency will expose the local sector to untapped expertise. (Image: Bongani Nkosi) MEDIA CONTACTS • Ndivhuwo Khangale Spokesperson Department of Energy +27 12 444 4283 or +27 82 465 6090  RELATED ARTICLES • Eskom to tap into public expertise • More wind power for SA • Huge savings from green light bulbs • Eskom build programme powers aheadBongani NkosiSouth Africa’s public energy sector stands to gain from increased exposure to international trends and skills, thanks to agreements signed between the Department of Energy and International Energy Agency (IEA) on 4 July 2011.The department’s minister Dipuo Peters announced the memorandum of understanding (MoU) signed with IEA. The MoU will help strengthen cooperation between the local industry and IEA, ensuring that the country gains advanced expertise.The agreement focuses on projects involving renewable energy, energy efficiency, clean technologies, data management and analysis, and policy analysis, among others.“This MoU will further enable us to leverage on the international expertise that the IEA embodies and will ensure streamlined cooperation where the entire sector benefits as opposed to only certain pockets of the sector,” said Peters in a media statement.IEA executives are visiting South Africa between 4 and 6 July for a bilateral conference with the Department of Energy.A strong relationship already exists between South Africa and IEA, and the MoU will take cooperation efforts a step further, said Peters.“This MoU is an important milestone for us because it seals the cooperative engagement that we enjoy with the IEA and also provides a common document which will enable both organisations to check and review the arrangement long after the two of us have left our respective portfolios.”Peters said a working group that will concentrate on ensuring that the MoU produces “tangible outputs” has been proposed for establishment.Need for new ideasWith various critical projects in the pipeline, the energy department will certainly gain from access to advanced expertise and prototype ideas.The creation of a R150-billion (US$22.2-million) solar park in Upington, Northern Cape, is currently the department’s largest venture, and it needs modern technology at its disposal to make success of it.When complete, the solar park will produce 5 000MW of power for the national grid. A section of the park is expected to start generating electricity by late 2012.The Department of Energy also has to work with state electricity utility Eskom to ensure that its upcoming major coal-fired power stations in Mpumalanga and Limpopo are not harmful to the environment.It is important for South Africa to work closely with reputable organisations as it’s looking for modern ways to expand capacity for energy generation and use, said Peters.“The IEA is one such organisation and this cooperation will ensure that we are able to catch up and are not left behind in this important global space.“This MoU is a symbol of the importance of creating conditions in which exchange of information and expertise can contribute to the reaching the goals of energy security, economic growth and environmental protection in South Africa and in the member countries of the IEA,” she added.Although South Africa is not a member of IEA, Peters said the country’s participation in its programmes is invaluable.Some 28 OECD countries belong to the IEA, which focuses on ensuring the availability of “reliable, affordable and clean” electricity among member states.“South Africa has benefited from participation in the IEA and wishes to continue deriving value from the IEA as well as also contributing to the wealth of knowledge and expertise that is embodied by the IEA,” Peters said.last_img read more

Ateneo celebrates latest UAAP feat with another bonfire

first_imgPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hosting Catholic schools seek legislated pay hike, too Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next DA eyes importing ‘galunggong’ anew Duterte wants probe of SEA Games mess Trending Articles PLAY LIST 00:50Trending Articles00:50Trending Articles01:00Chief Justice Peralta on upcoming UAAP game: UP has no match against UST02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games02:11Trump awards medals to Jon Voight, Alison Krauss LATEST STORIES ‘Rebel attack’ no cause for concern-PNP, AFP Two-day strike in Bicol fails to cripple transport Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. center_img Cayetano: Senate, Drilon to be blamed for SEA Games mess Athletes from the other Ateneo teams were also present during the celebration even alumni such as two-time UAAP basketball MVP Kiefer Ravena and three-time UAAP volleyball MVP Alyssa Valdez.Families of the athletes were also present.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSPalace wants Cayetano’s PHISGOC Foundation probed over corruption chargesSPORTSSingapore latest to raise issue on SEA Games food, logisticsA short program was held where the athletes thanked their supporters a few minutes before the bonfire was actually lit. Photo by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netMANILA, Philippines—Ateneo celebrated its athletes of the second semester with its second bonfire celebration of the season Friday at Ateneo de Manila University.The Lady Eagles captured the women’s volleyball title of Season 81 while the Blue Eagles ruled the men’s football tournament.ADVERTISEMENT Ethel Booba twits Mocha over 2 toilets in one cubicle at SEA Games venue MOST READ For the complete collegiate sports coverage including scores, schedules and stories, visit Inquirer Varsity. Ray Parks, Blackwater survive Ginebra in OT for 2-0 start View commentslast_img read more