Windies face tall order in second cricket Test against Pakistan

first_imgABU DHABI, United Arab Emirates (CMC):West Indies were plunged into survival mode with two days of the second Test remaining after their suspect batting failed on the third day here yesterday, allowing Pakistan to take a vice grip on the contest at the Sheikh Zayed Stadium.Needing a huge first-innings effort after resuming on 106 for four in reply to Pakistan’s 452, West Indies were dismissed for an average 224, 20 minutes before the scheduled tea break, to concede a deficit of 228 runs.Pakistan then dug in to reach the close on 114 for one, already 342 runs ahead, leaving West Indies with the distinct prospect of their second straight Test defeat and yet another series loss.First Test triple century maker Azhar Ali was unbeaten on 52, while his opening partner Sami Aslam made 50 before falling 25 minutes before the close.STRONG PARTNERSHIPThe pair put on 93, a partnership which further demoralised West Indies before the outstanding Shannon Gabriel broke the stand when he had the 20-year-old Aslam caught at the wicket by Shai Hope. He was initially adjudged not out, but the decision was overturned on review. The left-hander faced 111 balls and stroked five fours.Azhar, meanwhile, who has, so far, hit two fours in an innings requiring 102 deliveries, enjoyed a slice of luck when he was given lbw to part-time off-spinner Kraigg Brathwaite on 10, after missing a sweep.However, a subsequent review showed the ball had struck the glove first and the decision was overturned.The damage had been done earlier when West Indies failed to produce anything of worth with the bat, losing their last six wickets for the addition of 118 runs.Captain Jason Holder hammered an unbeaten 31, Roston Chase got 22, and nightwatchman Devendra Bishoo, 20, but the big innings required never materialised.Leg-spinner Yasir Shah picked up another three wickets to end with best figures of four for 86, while left-arm seamer Rahat Ali claimed three for 45 and pacer Sohail Khan, two for 35.SCOREBOARDPAKISTAN 1st innings 452WEST INDIES 1st innings(overnight 106 for four)L Johnson lbw b Rahat Ali 12D Bravo lbw b Yasir Shah 43K Brathwaite run out 21M Samuels c Sami Aslam b Rahat Ali 30D Bishoo b Sohail Khan 20J Blackwood c wkp Sarfraz Ahmed b Rahat Ali 8R Chase c Asad Shafiq b Yasir Shah 22+S Hope b Yasir Shah 11*J Holder not out 31M Cummins b Sohail Khan 3S Gabriel c Sohail Khan b Yasir Shah 13Extras (b2, lb7, nb1) 10TOTAL (all out, 94.4 overs) 224Fall of wickets: 1-27, 2-65, 3-106, 4-106, 5-121, 6-144, 7-169, 8-178, 9-197, 10-224.Bowling: Rahat Ali 21-8-45-3, Sohail Khan 19-8-35-2, Zulfiqar Babar 21-6-39-0, Asad Shafiq 1-0-2-0, Yasir Shah 28.4-6-86-4.PAKISTAN 2nd inningsSami Aslam c wkp Hope b Gabriel 50Azhar Ali not out 52Asad Shafiq not out 5Extras (b4, lb1, nb2) 7TOTAL (1 wkt, 39 overs) 114Fall of wicket: 1-93.Bowling: Gabriel 8-1-21-1 (nb2), Cummins 3-0-5-0, Brathwaite 13-2-27-0, Bishoo 12-0-45-0, Holder 3-0-11-0.Position: Pakistan lead by 342 runs.Toss: Pakistan.Umpires: M Gough, R Illingworth; TV – P Reiffel.last_img read more

PBA execs tenures set for review, revisions

first_img“We will improve our loyalty program and we will be putting up more in-venue activities,” commissioner Willie Marcial said. “We’ll make PBA games a thrill for all those who come.”In appointing Marcial early this year after the turbulent term of Chito Narvasa, the board decided to give the commissioner a three-year mandate to “heal the wounds” within the board, something that happened when the body was divided by several Narvasa decisions.The rift was apparent in the board’s annual planning session last year in Los Angeles, when the four-day gathering was reduced to an ordinary vacation as team representatives didn’t see eye to eye.Now that Marcial has done the healing, the league will return to its old practice and start evaluating the commissioner after his contract ends in 2020.ADVERTISEMENT The old practice has been for the chair to serve one term before passing the baton to the vice chair, according to a succession determined by the board.When the changes in the bylaws are made, the PBA will allow the sitting chair to seek reelection while the governor who is next in line awaits his turn.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSGinebra beats Meralco again to capture PBA Governors’ Cup titleSPORTSJapeth Aguilar wins 1st PBA Finals MVP award for GinebraSPORTSGolden State Warriors sign Lee to multiyear contract, bring back ChrissAs for the commissioner, the PBA departed last season from its old practice of giving the man in charge just a year to serve before his performance is evaluated if he could continue or not.Also up is a continued push to take the league closer to the fans as the PBA goes digital while making live games a greater experience to watch. Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard PLAY LIST 02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite03:23Negosyo sa Tagaytay City, bagsak sa pag-aalboroto ng Bulkang Taal01:13Christian Standhardinger wins PBA Best Player award Japeth Aguilar embraces role, gets rewarded with Finals MVP plum Lights inside SMX hall flicker as Duterte rants vs Ayala, Pangilinan anew Guiao-led PH five leave for Tehran View comments Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Allen Durham still determined to help Meralco win 1st PBA title Nadine Lustre’s phone stolen in Brazil Ginebra beats Meralco again to capture PBA Governors’ Cup title LAS Vegas—The Philippine Basketball Association (PBA) will ratify its constitution and bylaws when its board of governors planes back home next week.Foremost among the items will be the tenures of the commissioner and the chair.ADVERTISEMENT LATEST STORIES Lights inside SMX hall flicker as Duterte rants vs Ayala, Pangilinan anew Gov’t to employ 6,000 displaced by Taal Gretchen Barretto’s daughter Dominique graduates magna cum laude from California college Tim Cone, Ginebra set their sights on elusive All-Filipino crown Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. MOST READlast_img read more

Fibre roots set down as new digital hub opened in West Donegal

first_imgA new digital hub has been opened in West Donegal.Government Chief Whip and Minister for the Irish language, the Gaeltacht and the Islands, has said the opening of gteic Gaoth Dobhair changes perceptions of living and working in the Gaeltacht.“I’m delighted that the officials at Udaras na Gaeltachta are realising this dream today,” he said. “I think the perception of the Gaeltacht changes once you go into the Áislann Ghaoth Dobhair. You have a naonra, a museum, a library but on top of that you have international companies and you have local companies.“It gets rid of the perception of the Gaeltacht that it’s only insular type industry that goes on, providing for a local community. It’s bigger than that.“The Gaeltacht is no longer just about a position of geography. It has a geographical remit but ideas such as gteic are very much an international story which is going from strength to strength.”The gteic facility in Áislann Ghaoth Dobhair, is one of the latest digital hubs to be created by Udaras na Gaeltachta. About €12million has been spent on the state of the art building with business people, entrepreneurs, start-ups and their staff based at the facility having access to innovation units with office space, high speed internet, incubation units, hot desks, video conferencing and meeting rooms.It also has a library, art gallery and childcare facility on site.Mr McHugh said: “This new hub in Gaoth Dobhair will become a centre connected worldwide and position our county in a very advantageous position nationally.”The gteic hubs are part of Údarás’s strategy to develop Gréasán Digiteach na Gaeltachta (Gaeltacht Digital Network).Thirty innovation and digital hubs are planned throughout the Gaeltacht, including seven on Gaeltacht islands and another six on non-Gaeltacht islands, all of which are on or close to the Wild Atlantic Way. Two have been opened – Béal an Mhuirthead, Co Mayo and Daingean Uí Chúis, Kerry. Another three should open later this year – An Cheathrú Rua, An Spidéal and Carna in Galway.Twelve small businesses are in the Áislann Ghaoth Dobhair building and global companies like Pramerica and Optum (United Health) have located satellite offices alongside LG Marketing, Dearadh Grafach, Meastóirí Domhanda, Comhar Naíonraí na Gaeltachta, DLDC, LYIT, Aniar Teo and others.The gteic hubs are central to Údarás’s strategy to promote creativity, innovation and enterprise throughout the Gaeltacht, to facilitate remote working in rural Gaeltacht areas and help sustain the communities.It is also hoped the gteic hubs will inspire some of the Gaeltacht Diaspora to return to their local areas. Údarás are working on developing opportunities for a broad range of companies and individuals in this context.Government Chief Whip and the Minister of State with responsibility for the Irish Language, the Gaeltacht and the Islands, Joe McHugh, TD officially launched Údarás na Gaeltachta’s gteic Gréasán Digiteach na Gaeltachta a network of innovation and digital hubs in locations throughout Ireland’s Gaeltacht areas with Anna Ní Ghallachair, Board Member and Mícheál Ó hÉanaigh Príomhfheidhmeannach Údarás na Gaeltachta .Photo Clive WassonBridget Gallagher, Máire Ní Chonchonille Mary Ní Roarty and Judy Ní Ógáin at the Official opening of Údarás na Gaeltachta’s gteic @Gaoth Dobhair, a state-of-the-art innovation and digital hub, Government Chief Whip and the Minister of State with responsibility for the Irish Language, the Gaeltacht and the Islands, Joe McHugh, TD., gteic is a network of innovation & digital hubs in locations throughout Ireland’s Gaeltacht areas. Photo Clive WassonJim Slevin, Gearóid Breathnach, Aisling McBride and Noel McBride Official opening of Údarás na Gaeltachta’s gteic @Gaoth Dobhair, a state-of-the-art innovation and digital hub, Government Chief Whip and the Minister of State with responsibility for the Irish Language, the Gaeltacht and the Islands, Joe McHugh, TD., gteic is a network of innovation & digital hubs in locations throughout Ireland’s Gaeltacht areas. Photo Clive WassonGovernment Chief Whip and the Minister of State with responsibility for the Irish Language, the Gaeltacht and the Islands, Joe McHugh, TD officially launched Údarás na Gaeltachta’s gteic Gréasán Digiteach na Gaeltachta a network of innovation and digital hubs in locations throughout Ireland’s Gaeltacht areas with Anna Ní Ghallachair, Board Member and Mícheál Ó hÉanaigh Príomhfheidhmeannach Údarás na Gaeltachta. Photo Clive WassonGuests at the Official opening of Údarás na Gaeltachta’s gteic @Gaoth Dobhair, a state-of-the-art innovation and digital hub, Government Chief Whip and the Minister of State with responsibility for the Irish Language, the Gaeltacht and the Islands, Joe McHugh, TD., gteic is a network of innovation & digital hubs in locations throughout Ireland’s Gaeltacht areas. Photo Clive WassonDonnchadh Ó Baoill, Development Executive at Údarás na Gaeltachta demonstrates the video conferencing at the Official opening of Údarás na Gaeltachta’s gteic @Gaoth Dobhair, a state-of-the-art innovation and digital hub, Government Chief Whip and the Minister of State with responsibility for the Irish Language, the Gaeltacht and the Islands, Joe McHugh, TD., gteic is a network of innovation & digital hubs in locations throughout Ireland’s Gaeltacht areas. Photo Clive WassonOfficial opening of Údarás na Gaeltachta’s gteic @Gaoth Dobhair, a state-of-the-art innovation and digital hub, Government Chief Whip and the Minister of State with responsibility for the Irish Language, the Gaeltacht and the Islands, Joe McHugh, TD., gteic is a network of innovation & digital hubs in locations throughout Ireland’s Gaeltacht areas. Photo Clive WassonGovernment Chief Whip and the Minister of State with responsibility for the Irish Language, the Gaeltacht and the Islands, Joe McHugh, TD officially launched Údarás na Gaeltachta’s gteic Gréasán Digiteach na Gaeltachta a network of innovation and digital hubs in locations throughout Ireland’s Gaeltacht areas with Anna Ní Ghallachair, Board Member and Mícheál Ó hÉanaigh Príomhfheidhmeannach Údarás na Gaeltachta. Photo Clive WassonOfficial opening of Údarás na Gaeltachta’s gteic @Gaoth Dobhair, a state-of-the-art innovation and digital hub, Government Chief Whip and the Minister of State with responsibility for the Irish Language, the Gaeltacht and the Islands, Joe McHugh, TD., gteic is a network of innovation & digital hubs in locations throughout Ireland’s Gaeltacht areas. Photo Clive WassonMícheál Ó hÉanaigh Príomhfheidhmeannach Údarás na Gaeltachta speaking at the Official opening of Údarás na Gaeltachta’s gteic @Gaoth Dobhair, a state-of-the-art innovation and digital hub, Government Chief Whip and the Minister of State with responsibility for the Irish Language, the Gaeltacht and the Islands, Joe McHugh, TD., gteic is a network of innovation & digital hubs in locations throughout Ireland’s Gaeltacht areas. Photo Clive WassonGovernment Chief Whip and the Minister of State with responsibility for the Irish Language, the Gaeltacht and the Islands, Joe McHugh, TD officially launched Údarás na Gaeltachta’s gteic Gréasán Digiteach na Gaeltachta a network of innovation and digital hubs in locations throughout Ireland’s Gaeltacht areas. Photo Clive WassonGovernment Chief Whip and the Minister of State with responsibility for the Irish Language, the Gaeltacht and the Islands, Joe McHugh, TD officially launched Údarás na Gaeltachta’s gteic Gréasán Digiteach na Gaeltachta a network of innovation and digital hubs in locations throughout Ireland’s Gaeltacht areas with Anna Ní Ghallachair, Board Member and Mícheál Ó hÉanaigh Príomhfheidhmeannach Údarás na Gaeltachta .Photo Clive WassonA VR guided tours as Government Chief Whip and the Minister of State with responsibility for the Irish Language, the Gaeltacht and the Islands, Joe McHugh, TD officially launched Údarás na Gaeltachta’s gteic Gréasán Digiteach na Gaeltachta a network of innovation and digital hubs in locations throughout Ireland’s Gaeltacht areas with Eamon Gallagher, Meastóirí Domhanda a virtual relaity house design company supplying the US market. Photo Clive WassonOfficial opening of Údarás na Gaeltachta’s gteic @Gaoth Dobhair, a state-of-the-art innovation and digital hub, Government Chief Whip and the Minister of State with responsibility for the Irish Language, the Gaeltacht and the Islands, Joe McHugh, TD., gteic is a network of innovation & digital hubs in locations throughout Ireland’s Gaeltacht areas from left are Mícheál Ó Duibhir Michael Logue, Project Manager Prmaerica. Photo Clive WassonFibre roots set down as new digital hub opened in West Donegal was last modified: April 17th, 2018 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more

CSIR Conference focuses on SMME programmes

first_imgDelegates heard about the growth of and challenges in the industries relating to science and innovation at the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research’s sixth biannual conference in Pretoria.Besides various panel discussions, the CSIR Conference features live demonstrations of CSIR-developed technologies that are benefitting an array of sectors from mining to energy, to aerospace and defence. (Image: CSIR, Facebook)Melissa JavanA total of 181 new permanent jobs were created through 22 enterprises that were supported by the Biomanufacturing Industry Development Centre (BIDC) programme of the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR), said Daniel Visser, a speaker at the biannual CSIR Conference.The two-day event, taking place on 5 and 6 October, was held at the CSIR International Convention Centre in Pretoria. The theme of the conference was “Ideas that work for industrial development”.CSIR CEO Dr Thulani Dlamini said the event celebrated some of the work the council undertook with public and private sector partners to contribute to industrial development.Developing biomanufacturing in South AfricaThe BIDC programme had supported many small-, medium and micro enterprises (SMMEs) in South Africa, mostly in Gauteng, said Visser, research and development strategy manager at the CSIR. “The majority of the SMMEs we’ve supported are black owned.”They include OptimusBio, which creates an industrial biologics product; Mamoa Trading Enterprise, which creates a cosmetics product; Sliek, which creates lactose-free products; and Golden Goose, which creates a traditional beverage product.Since 2013, the BIDC has trained 72 interns – between 20 and 25 interns per year. The programme has also created 201 temporary jobs and 20 permanent staff are employed. A total of 75 new products were transferred to enterprises.According to the council, the programme provides access to infrastructure, expertise and skilled human capital. The initiative is in line with the Department of Trade and Industry’s Industrial Policy Action Plan and the Department of Science and Technology’s Bioeconomy Strategy.Biomanufacturing is a small sector, said Visser, although it crossed a lot of industries.South Africa’s global competitivenessThe UK and South Africa had a lot of similarities when it came to the bioeconomy sector, said Kris Wadrop, director of industrial biotechnology and biorefining in that country’s Centre for Process Innovation.He was speaking in the “Industrial development of SMMEs in the bioeconomy sector” session. “What Christo (Fourie) of the Industrial Development Corporation said is applicable to the UK. We seem to be learning and going through the same experiences all over the world.”His company was a bit like the CSIR. “It’s not as big as the CSIR, but it is has four business units.”Wadrop advised that collaborations were very important when it came to bringing an idea to product, and then the product to market. “You need a lot of different skills to get that product to the market. If an SMME only has two staff members, it’s going to be difficult to finish the project (if you do not collaborate with others).”Visser and Wadrop were also on the panel discussion “Local pharmaceutical manufacturing: what can South Africa’s competitive advantage be?”.On that panel, Makekele Sono-Tladi, managing director of Elvema Nutrition, said SMMEs needed to master the route to commercialisation of a product. “You need to educate the consumers before you even take the product to the (shop’s) shelves. You need to introduce the product to the people.“This industry can be booming if we just master the commercialisation route.”Regarding funding, Dr Sibongile Gumbi, founder and CEO of iVac Biotherapeutics, said: “Be strategic in how you are going to get funding. We were fortunate enough to get funding from a private investor.”Ross Norton, chairman of the chemical company SA Bioproducts, said the “Overseas is better than local” mindset of consumers should be addressed. “We should challenge local people who don’t want to buy local goods.”Panel discussion on what role can science, technology and innovation play in industrial development #CSIRconf2017 pic.twitter.com/pQsg1LoUpa— CSIR (@CSIR) October 5, 2017Minister of trade and industry giving the key note address #CSIRConf2017 pic.twitter.com/eRR1v7m8Rk— Green-STEMfoundation (@Green_STEMorg) October 5, 2017Get more children in to the ECD centres #CSIRConf2017 Sizwe Nxasana— Khethiwe Ngema (@KGN9) October 5, 2017What to do with chicken feather waste…interesting applications explained by Prof Bruce Sithole #CSIRConf2017 pic.twitter.com/1GeFPOZB7j— Dr Lorren Haywood (@LorrenHaywood) October 5, 2017Reduce the barriers to access in the biotech industry, especially for startups – Dr Gumbi #CSIRConf2017— Bathong Wena… (@TheeRorisang) October 5, 2017Minister Pandor of @dstgovza compliments @CSIR on 72nd anniversary & challenges experts to drive ‘transformative innovations’ #CSIRConf2017— GrowSA (@GrowSANet) October 5, 2017Source: Council for Scientific and Industrial ResearchWould you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See Using Brand South Africa material.last_img read more

The Dawes Arboretum: A haven for tree collection, evaluation, and research

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest By Mike Ryan, OCJ field reporterWhat began as a successful, influential Ohio politician and businessman’s 140-acre rural retreat has grown over the past century to become a nearly 2,000 acre preserve highlighting a unique array of plant life at The Dawes Arboretum in Licking County.Beman Dawes and his wife, Bertie, first purchased the original tract in 1917. By 1929, when Dawes Arboretum was established, the grounds had doubled in size and over 50,000 trees had been planted. In present times, the immense arboretum, home to an enormous index of different plant species, is one of only 20 fully accredited arboretums in North America.The Dawes family obtained trees from across the globe that could thrive in central Ohio and planted them around the property. They established the arboretum to both educate and inspire.When Beman and Bertie created the private foundation, they wanted “to encourage the planting of forest and ornamental trees…to give pleasure to the public and education to the youth.”Luke Messinger, executive director of The Dawes Arboretum, said that the location was well-chosen for this purpose and that this collection of trees continues to grow and prosper over 100 years after the Dawes family’s initial purchase of their central Ohio grounds.“With its diversity of forests, Ohio is a great place to preserve the trees of the Ohio River Valley. Beman Dawes always had a love of forestry and did a lot of research about how to reforest Ohio, and what trees would be best for that purpose,” Messinger said. “Today, we keep records on 17,000 plant species here at the Arboretum and we are actively involved with plant conservation and research. We usually collect these plants from the wild and most of our collection consists of plants from the Ohio River Valley. We also partner with other groups and gardens around the world for more exotic plants, trying to find species that will grow well in Ohio. Many of the plants that you see growing here at the Arboretum are the plants you will see at local garden centers and nurseries in the future.”The Arboretum’s aim is to preserve native landscapes and the destination features a variety of forest, grassland, and wetland ecosystems. Many trees and shrubs are planted in groves of like species, which, depending on the seasonal cycles can make for incredibly photogenic sightseeing for visitors. Gracing the grounds are group plantings of crabapples, magnolias, Gingkos, Buckeyes, flowering shrubs, rhododendrons, beech trees, redwoods, conifers, and other interesting tree plots.Other notable features include a Japanese garden, a picturesque lake, a cypress swamp, and tours of the founding family’s home, the Daweswood House. A pioneer cemetery, a Visitor Center, picnic areas, and monuments and memorials dot the landscape of this property as well.This tree haven draws visitors for a variety of reasons.“Whenever you put landscape plants together, you create beauty and people interact with the natural beauty of plants in a variety of ways. People enjoy this park in different ways, but they are all mostly drawn to the Arboretum for the beauty and diversity of the plants and for an interaction with nature,” Messinger said. “We are presently conducting research on apple trees and, in partnership with the American Chestnut Foundation, we are studying to find out if we can bring the American chestnut back. It is a long row to hoe for the trees, but we are keeping our fingers crossed that they can once again be a viable part of the Ohio landscape in the future.”Not only a sanctuary of trees providing humans a place of respite, the Arboretum is also a sanctuary for wildlife and it is an important center for research. Much of the fauna native to Ohio inhabit this property and the Arboretum partners with several federal agencies and state universities in the tracking and study of some of its more unique wildlife. For instance, according to the organization, there are 89 bluebird nest structures on the property and they have 40 years of extensive bluebird observation records. Dawes Arboretum has an expansive ongoing inventory of dragon and damselflies. They study the six bat species that hunt the preserve and there are nine species of salamanders that call the Arboretum home.Dawes Arboretum is also an important educational resource for the community.“In keeping with our mission to collect, evaluate, and research trees, we are a source of environmental education and natural history education,” Messinger said. “We often entertain school field trips and offer a variety of programs and workshops throughout the year on trees, history, and nature — on everything from landscape development to bird and tree identification, to youth programs and guided seasonal walking tours. Many of these programs aim to educate participants about what trees look and thrive best in certain seasons and in different situations in this geographical area.”Agriculture figures big in The Dawes Arboretum’s future plans.“Agriculture was a key component of Beman Dawes’ mission. He first purchased the property as a farm. He had a dairy, feed crop operation, apple production, and maple-syruping on-site. We are continuing that legacy today and into the future. We are interested in using agriculture as a land management strategy and currently lease out approximately 250 acres of land for agricultural production, Messinger said. “As part of our future educational program, we plan to create a demonstration conservation farm and use it as an educational tool for everyone from school children, to college students, to lifelong learners: people interested in modern conservation farming practices. The farm will focus on the farming heritage of Licking County and the state of Ohio while illustrating the diversity of agricultural crops grown in the region.”Visitors to this woody refuge can enjoy it afoot or by car. A paved driving tour takes motorists around the sprawling acres of unique tree plantings. Over 11 miles of walking paths and hiking trails weave their way through the groves, offering opportunities for fresh air, exercise, and a slow-paced chance for reflection.Just this year, The Dawes Arboretum began charging admission to the preserve at a cost comparable to other arboretums of its size across the nation.“The decision to charge admission was made to provide the stability necessary to manage our plant collections, gardens, and natural areas at an appropriate level for current visitors and future generations. We want to continue to be able to offer the educational programs that we do and want to make sure that we can remain focused on our education and research components. We do not want to be complacent as merely a pretty place, but to maintain our role in plant conservation, research, and education,” Messinger said.Admission cost is $10 for adults and $5 for children 5 and over. Annual membership costs for individuals are $40 and a family membership costs $60. Members of the Arboretum enjoy free admission and reciprocal benefits at other participating arboretums across the country, among other advantages.The Dawes Arboretum is located at 7770 Jacksontown Road outside of Newark. Their hours change seasonally and are different for members and non-members. More information can be found at dawesarb.org and they can be reached by telephone at 1-800-44-DAWES.last_img read more

Weekly Wrapup: Smart Cards, Android, eReader Pricing, And More…

first_img8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Market richard macmanus Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… ReadWriteEnterpriseOur channel ReadWriteEnterprise, devoted to ‘enterprise 2.0’ and using social software inside organizations. RSS isn’t Dead (Just Ask Executives) It’s become fashionable among a certain set to declare that RSS is no longer the foremost pipeline for news and information on the Web. Many have abandoned their RSS readers in favor of Twitter. But what do businesses think about RSS? The McKinsey Global Survey on Web 2.0 in business states that 42% of executives see a measurable benefit from RSS. That’s 24% more than those who see any benefit from microblogging (i.e. Twitter).ReadWriteStartOur channel ReadWriteStart, sponsored by Microsoft BizSpark, is dedicated to profiling startups and entrepreneurs.Rails Rumble: Micro-App Competition Winners Announced In 48 hours last weekend, 237 developer teams competed and generated a total of 137 qualifying web applications, all developed with Ruby and Rails on the back end. The 2009 Rails Rumble was, according to organizers, the strongest yet in the contest’s history. SEE MORE STARTUPS COVERAGE IN OUR READWRITESTART CHANNELWeb ProductsGoogle Chrome OS to Feature Single Sign-On for Chrome Browser We don’t know much about the upcoming OS from Google, Chrome OS. However recent reports tell us how tightly integrated the Google Chrome web browser will be with the operating system. It makes us wonder if Google will be required to support other web browsers on their new platform? After all, it’s one thing to integrate your own browser with your OS (as Microsoft does with IE) but it’s another thing to not even offer a choice.Facebook Connect Expands: Next Stop, Mobile Web Facebook announced this week the launch of a new program called “Facebook Connect For Mobile Web.” The Connect platform, which originally launched in 2008, is already available for traditional websites as well as Apple’s iPhone. With this update, it can now exist for any mobile platform, too. My First Day as an Android Owner; by Marshall Kirkpatrick, Lead Writer I’ve been a happy iPhone user for about a year but I just bought an Android phone this week and I like it a lot. Android is not as polished, as popular, maybe not even as good as the iPhone so far – but if I had to choose between them right now…I might pick Android. Below are some thoughts about the hardware, the learning curve, the App Market and Augmented Reality apps in particular.Opera 10: A Pretty Good Browser, But Will Anybody Use It? After numerous betas and two release candidates, Opera this week released the final version of Opera 10, the company’s flagship desktop Internet browser. Users who skipped all the pre-release versions of Opera 10 will be pleasantly surprised with the updates that Opera has brought to its browser. These include Opera Turbo (the company’s compression technology), visual tabs, a smarter spell checker, and a faster rendering engine.SEE MORE WEB PRODUCTS COVERAGE IN OUR PRODUCTS CATEGORYThat’s a wrap for another week! Enjoy your weekend everyone. Related Posts center_img Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… Purchase The ReadWriteWeb Guide to Online Community ManagementOur First Premium Report for Businesses Recently we released our first premium report: The ReadWriteWeb Guide to Online Community Management. Businesses seeking to engage with online communities on their own websites or all around the social web will find the guide invaluable in getting up to speed on the state of the art and making sure their employees have the foundation they need to be effective. The report is a 75 page collection of case studies, advice and discussion concerning the most important issues in online community. You will also get a companion online aggregator that delivers the most-discussed articles each day. All of this is available for purchase at a price of $299. You can download a free sample section of the report here. Web TrendsHong Kong’s Octopus Card: Utility Outweighs Privacy Concerns This week we looked at Smart Cards. We profiled Japan’s cutting edge Suica Card, London’s Oyster Card, and a widely used smart card that has been in service since 1997: the Octopus Card in Hong Kong. Octopus is used as a form of electronic payment in a wide variety of public transport, shops, restaurants, car parks and more. Indeed the Octopus has become an all-purpose identification system in Hong Kong – but at what cost to privacy?Augmented Reality for iPhone May Not Come Next Month After All Developers and enthusiasts had hoped that official support for Augmented Reality (AR), the display of data on top of a view of the real world, would come to the iPhone in early September. This week’s announcement of a big Apple event on September 9th focused on the iPod, however, gives reason to suspect that the next version of the iPhone operating system will spend more time in the oven.Your Cyborg Eye Will Talk to You Just as many of us are getting used to augmented reality applications for cellphones and digital cameras, Babak Amir Parviz and his University of Washington students are taking it one step further. The group is working on a human machine interface where LEDs are embedded into contact lenses in order to display information to the wearer. Would You Pay More Than $99 For an eReader? EBooks and eReaders are a hot topic right now, especially with the new line-up of Kindle competitors scheduled to arrive before the holiday season. However, according to a new report by Forrester Research, most people aren’t willing to pay a lot for these devices. Forrester asked consumers at what price they would consider an eReader expensive but still buy it. The answer was generally somewhere between $50 and $99.SEE MORE WEB TRENDS COVERAGE IN OUR TRENDS CATEGORYA Word from Our SponsorsWe’d like to thank ReadWriteWeb’s sponsors, without whom we couldn’t bring you all these stories every week!Mashery is the leading provider of API management services.Domain.ME, the official registry for all .ME Domains.Codero, Dedicated Hosting with Backup & Managed Services.Groupsite.com, How Groups Make Things Happen.Crowd Science gives you detailed visitor demographics.hakia is a semantic search engine.Rackspace provides dedicated server hosting.Aplus provides web hosting services for small business hosting needs.MediaTemple provides hosting for RWW.SixApart provides our publishing software MT4. Tags:#web#Weekly Wrap-ups In this edition of the Weekly Wrapup – our newsletter summarizing the top stories of the week – we review the state of smart cards around the world, update you on the latest Augmented Reality news, ask whether eReaders are being priced too high, analyze Google’s Chrome OS browser plans, present our hands-on impressions of an Android phone, and more. We also check in on our two new channels: ReadWriteEnterprise (devoted to ‘enterprise 2.0’ trends and products) and ReadWriteStart (dedicated to profiling startups and entrepreneurs). The Weekly Wrapup is sponsored by Awareness Inc Webinar: Marketing to the Social Web:Subscribe to Weekly WrapupYou can subscribe to the Weekly Wrapup by RSS or by email (form below).RWW Weekly Wrap-up Email Subscription form:last_img read more

Ground-Source Heat Pumps, Part 2: Rules of Thumb

first_imgRELATED MULTIMEDIA Podcast: Ground Source Heat Pumps, Part 1: the BasicsPodcast: Ground-Source Heat Pumps, Part 3: Five QuestionsAre Affordable Ground-Source Heat Pumps On the Horizon?Ground-Source Heat Pumps (2010)Ground-Source Heat Pumps (2009)GBA Encyclopedia: Heat Pumps: The BasicsGBA Encyclopedia: Green Heating OptionsGround Source Heat Pumps Don’t Save EnergyGround Source Heat Pumps Have Low Operating CostsHeating a Tight, Well-Insulated HouseEquipment Versus EnvelopeIs a Ground-Source Heat Pump a Renewable Energy System?Air-Source or Ground-Source Heat Pump? In Part One of this episode from the Green Architects’ Lounge, we only scratched the surface. Now it’s time to really dig in and decide if a ground-source heat pump system is right for you, and if so, to start planning for it.In Part Two of the podcast, we discuss:A tale of two houses: Chris shares a story of two houses—one a success, and one that had to abandon using a ground-source heat pumpRule of thumb for flow: 3 gal. per minute per ton of heating/coolingRules of thumb for well depth: Open Loop55-ft. depth per ton at 30% bleed85-ft. depth per ton at 10% bleed150-ft. depth per ton at 5% bleed or lessRule of thumb for well depth: Closed Loop175-ft. depth per tonBe sure to check out Part One, where we discuss the difference between the various ground source heat pump options and share the recipe for a Dark and Stormy. Also, be sure to tune in later for Part Three, when we’ll play “Five Questions” with two professional ground source heat pump installers, Jeff Gagnon and Jim Godbout, and then address the elephant in the room: cost.Enjoy the show.center_img OFFICIAL TRANSCRIPTChris Briley: Want to talk about the advantages of open loop versus closed?Phil Kaplan: Well, we talked about it briefly. There’s a higher risk when you do the open loop, and big cost ramifications.Chris: Imagine this. This is the reason why if you go to Google “geothermal” or “ground source heat pumps” or talk to different people, you’re going to get zealots on each side saying, “I would never do ground source heat pumps; they make no sense whatsoever.” And then you turn right around and someone says, “They’re the best. I always do that because they’re so efficient and great.” I did a project—a 2500-sq.-ft. house with an energy-efficient shell and some passive solar design—and we did an open loop system. The whole infrastructure cost about $28,000, which is not bad for a ground source heat pump. I don’t think I could hit that number today; that was in 2006.Phil: It’s not a cheap system.Chris: It’s not. The owners of this house had one utility bill from June 2007 to June 2008—electric, because the pump runs on electricity—and it was just over $1,000. That’s pretty good. You spend $28,000 and your bill is $1,000 from now until whenever. You show that to somebody and they say, “Wow! I’m doing that!”Now, I had another house of 2600 sq. ft. that we were going to do geothermal for. I got the quote for the well: $72,000. What? I asked if it was $72,000 for the pump and the well and the distribution, and he said no; the well and the earth coupling—getting water into the house—72 grand. I called up Jeff Gagnon—he and another mechanical contractor Jim Godbout will be on playing Five Questions. These guys are professionals who have installed this stuff with lots of success. So, Jeff gets on the phone, and he’s like “That’s insane!” Fast-forward a couple of weeks later, and the earth coupling is $32,000. So, I’ve got 30 grand inside the building and 30 grand outside. Uh-uh, we’re done. Good night, Irene. For a relatively efficient 2600-sq.-ft. house, there’s no way.Why was that the case with one house and not the other? It comes down to a lot of the variables that have to do with an open-loop system. For instance, let’s talk about some rules of thumb for geothermal and an open loop system. For your ground source heat pump, you’re going to want to plan for about 3 gallons per minute of flow from your well—3 gallons a minute per ton to heat and cool. For a house with a 60,000 Btu demand, you’ll want about 5 tons of heat; a ton of heat is 12,000 Btu. I want 3 gallons a minute to go through that 5-ton system, so I need 15 gallons a minute to flow through that thing. That doesn’t necessarily mean the well has to produce 15 gallons a minute; I just have to have it available. So, there might be storage tanks or some other mechanism. The heat pump won’t always be on. You need flow out of the well. If you have a low-flow well, you have to dig deeper so that you have a higher recharge rate. With well depth in an open loop system, there’s a thing called bleed. I can draw water out, and I can put back up to 30% in a different location. If the house is near a body of water in Maine, the system has to have at least 5% bleed. What this means is I can pull the water out of the well, but I have to put it all back in except for 5% of it.Phil: That still creeps me out a little, Chris.Chris: It’s OK that it creeps you out, because there are some ramifications to this. Here’s a rule of thumb: If you’re doing an open loop system and you’re allowed to have 30% bleed, then it’s basically 55 ft. per ton of cooling. If the demand of the house is lower than the well is shallow…if you’ve got a high-demand house, then you need more water, you need more mass and you need more flow.Phil: And it’s more expensive. So, smaller, more efficient house, and everything else gets cheaper.Chris: If you can get down to 10% bleed, then you’re 85 ft. per ton. This is a standard 8- or 6-in. well casing. If you’re at zero bleed, then you’re at 150 ft. per ton. So, if you need 5 tons of heat, then you’re in a really deep well. And if you have an even higher-demand house with zero bleed, then you’re digging even deeper.Now, back to that example of the house that didn’t work out—we were getting low yield off the well. We were probably getting 2 gallons a minute, and we had dug down 250 ft. That means we would have had to dig down quite a bit deeper, and in this region, we probably would have hit salt. If we hit salt water, everything has to be stainless steel, and it gets crazy. And we’re not allowed much bleed. So, we’d need one well to dump our bleed in, and we’d need two wells to feed the house. We’d be digging three wells for this house to make a geothermal system work. That’s insane.All of this would be great to know up front, but since a lot of people are learning this as they slog their way through, they run into these variables.Phil: I’m curious where in the country open loop is allowed and where it’s not allowed.Chris: At the first house, that well almost went artesian. We were getting almost 100 gallons a minute and we were only 150 ft. deep. The well guy was like, “Guys, we are done here. If we go any further, we’re not going to be able to cap this thing. It will overflow, and we’ll have a stream in the back. Then we’ll have to plan for that.” I was thinking, “Awesome! We could put a turbine on it!” That was dumb, but I couldn’t help myself. Anyway, we did a classic pump and dump on that—which is frowned upon by people like you, and probably me, if I knew what was going on back then. Ninety percent of the water that comes out and goes through the pump gets discharged overboard. However, it’s only being used in the dead of winter. We were pulling out perfectly potable water at 150 ft. deep—not very deep in an aquifer—probably very similar water quality to what’s on top, and heck, they’re drinking it, so it’d better be good. We were just discharging that overboard, and it was a very wet environment where it was, so it was probably all OK. So, it was freezing cold outside, and freezing cold water was being dumped—who cares.However, there are situations commercially … in fact, there’s a lawsuit at an inn that put in a significant geothermal system, an open loop system, and what happened was a lot of people around there started getting salt in their wells—which tends to happen coastally, but when it happens to an entire neighborhood after something just changed, which was the installation of this thing, they have a point. They have a class-action lawsuit, which is happening right now and may trigger some regulations in your state—which happened to us, which is why there are a lot of bleed regulations, especially around bodies of water.Phil: So, if you want an open loop system, get it now while it’s still legal.Chris: Well, what you want is to make sure it’s done responsibly. It may take two wells. Make sure you check all the regulations and your installer know what the heck he’s doing. Otherwise, you’re going to turn around and be spending 70 grand on a well they started a month ago that’s now three wells, because they’re learning on the job.Phil: Closed loop—I love these rules of thumb.Chris: In a closed loop system, you can do horizontal or you can do vertical. If you’re doing horizontal, that means coils of PEX tubing. You’ll dig down 6 to 8 ft. deep.Phil: Oh, is it that much?Chris: Well, if you’re in Virgina, 4 or 5 ft. deep. If you’re in Maine, 8 or 10 ft. deep—which is why we don’t do it here. There are only a few installations, and they’re not doing well. The closed loop horizontal is not so good when your frost depth is 48 in. That means the temperature is 32. Here in Maine we go vertical rather than horizontal.Phil: So, unless you own a backhoe—which most of us do up here in Maine…Chris: In a vertical closed loop system, instead of burying the tubes, you’re shoving them down a well—so the well has to be quite a bit bigger, because you’re not using the well water; you’re using water that you put into the well and draw back out again. That would typically be 175 ft. deep per ton. It’s not unheard of to be 1,000 ft. deep to do a closed loop vertical system.Phil: I thought you were talking me into this.Chris: No! Because a closed loop system—while more stable and more controlled and not dealing with bleed issues; you already know how deep you’re going to go and you’re not concerned about the flow of the well—that’s a lot of infrastructure.Phil: Yeah, it is, but stay tuned. There’s a reason why these things are still around and people get excited about them. I’m a naysayer, but I’m wrong often. So, why don’t we take a little break, and when we come back we’re going to hear from two guys who are experts in this area. They’re going to tell us when a house is a good candidate for a ground source heat pump and when it’s not.last_img read more

Utility Buys Champion Decathlon House

first_imgLast summer, as the 2011 Solar Decathlon team representing University of Maryland toiled away at its contest entry, a 920-sq.-ft. one-bedroom consisting of two “shed” modules arranged in a staggered, split-butterfly configuration, the hope was that the building would eventually be sold to a couple whose annual income was in the $75,000-to-$115,000 range.The house, known as WaterShed, has since acquired high-tech celebrity as the overall winner of the Decathlon and very recently attracted a buyer, energy company Pepco, whose annual income falls well above the recommended range.As University of Maryland announced this week, WaterShed will be moved to one of Pepco’s facilities in Maryland’s Montgomery County, where it will serve as both an educational showcase and research tool. The university will partner with the utility on the building’s operation and help monitor its performance.A living laboratoryIn its “Where We Live” blog, the Washington Post noted that the home sold for $200,000. The purchase agreement calls for assistance from the WaterShed team in transporting the house to the Montgomery County site, although Pepco will pay disassembly, transport, reassembly, and site costs. Team members also will serve as docents at the house once it opens for public display.The house features 2×10 solid and 9.25-in. engineered wood for the floor framing, 1-1/8-in. tongue-and-groove Avantech floor sheathing, and 6 in. of Demilec Heatlok Soy closed-cell spray foam, bringing the system to R-39. Exterior walls are built with a hybrid system of standard stick framing and heavy timber framing, two layers of 2-in. extruded polystyrene over 2×6 tongue-and-groove sheathing, and 5.5 in. of Demilec Sealection in the stud bays, bringing the entire wall system to R-44.5. The roofs for both modules are insulated with 3.5 in. of Demilec Heatlok Soy and 4 in. of polyisocyanurate on the exterior, bringing them to R-57.26. Thermo-treated wood is used for the siding and decking.Once the Solar Decathlon began last fall in Washington, WaterShed led the competition most of the way, scoring more than 90 points out of a possible 100 in eight of the contest’s 10 competition categories.last_img read more

Saina makes shock exit, Indian campaign ends at Asian Games

first_imgIndia’s Saina Nehwal looks dejected after losing to Hong Kongs Yip Py during the quarterfinal match of the women’s singles badminton event of 16th Asian Games at Tianhe Gymnasium in Guangzhou, China on Thursday. PTIIndia’s gold medal hope Saina Nehwal suffered a shock defeat in the women’s singles quarter-finals as country’s campaign ended in the badminton event of the Asian Games in Guangzhou on Thursday.World number three Saina lost 8-21 21-8 19-18 to last edition’s silver medallist and world number 12 Yip Pui Yin of Hong Kong in the fiercely fought quarter-final, which lasted 46 minutes.Saina was carrying millions of Indian hopes as all of her compatriots had already crashed of their respective events early in the day.The second seed Saina came back well after surrendering the opening game but her weak net-play, in comparison to her sixth seed rival, dented her chances severely.The Indian saved a match point in the decisive game but a service error at crucial 19-20 stage sealed her fate.Both the players fought their hearts out in the third and final game. Even till the deep end the scores were tied 18-18.Yip attacked Saina’s backhand throughout the match and earned her first match point with the same strategy with a smash winner.Saina managed to save that and got her service back but unforced error on the next point brought curtains on her campaign.At Beijing Olympics also Saina had lost at the same quarter-final stage.Early in the day, men’s singles player Aravind Bhat and mixed doubles pair of Jwala Gutta and V Diju also crashed out.advertisementBhat lost 19-21 12-21 to world number sixth Boonsak Ponsana of Thailand in his second round encounter at the Tianhe Gymnasium here.Jwala and Diju further plunged the Indian camp in dismay as they squandered a first game advantage to lose a gruelling battle against Koreans Baekcheol Shin and Hyojung Lee in the mixed doubles event.The Indian pair lost 21-17 13-21 16-21 against the Korean combination in a 36-minute match.Bhat, who had got a walk over in his opening round match against Niluka Karunaratne of Sri Lanka, found it tough to negotiate the smashes of Poonsana as the Thai player scored 20 smash points compared to Bhat’s seven.In the first game, Bhat caught up with Poonsana after trailing 5-10 to make it 12-12 and moved neck-to-neck till 17-17 but the Thai shuttler marched ahead from there on.In the second game, Poonsana opened a six point lead and did not allow the Indian to come back as Bhat’s game crumbled.Bhat’s compatriot and Commonwealth Games bronze medallist Parupalli Kashyap had made a first round exit on Wednesday.With inputs from PTIlast_img read more

Football Delhi Launches Second Season of Golden League for U-7, U-9 and U-11 Age Categories

first_img Get the best of News18 delivered to your inbox – subscribe to News18 Daybreak. Follow News18.com on Twitter, Instagram, Facebook, Telegram, TikTok and on YouTube, and stay in the know with what’s happening in the world around you – in real time. footballFootball DelhiGolden Leagueindian football First Published: September 29, 2019, 11:26 PM IST New Delhi: The second edition of Football Delhi’s Golden League was launched on Sunday at the Jawaharlal Nehru stadium. Close to 500 budding footballers came to the stadium to witness the kick-off, backed by the league’s sponsors ONGC and Power Finance Corporation.After the inaugural edition last year, the league, aimed at providing a platform to boys and girls between the age group of 5 and 11, is all set for its second year in a mixed-team format. The league will have teams in three different categories — U-7, U-9 and U-11 — and will have both boys and girls in the participating teams. It will provide more points to the teams with more number of girls.Last year, the Golden League saw 176 teams playing a total of 751 matches. This time, more than 200 teams are expected to register for the second edition of the league. A total of 1,200 matches across 15 venues will be played this season. The league will have matches on 12 consecutive Sundays with 100-150 matches each day, starting from October 13.Football Delhi President Shaji Prabhakaran said, “This is an ambitious project and would not have been possible without the support of all the stakeholders, sponsors and parents who have come out in huge numbers to the ground to support the league.”Speaking at the launch, Shivendra Dutt Shukla, General Manager (HR) and Head Corporate Sports, ONGC, said, “It is the first federation in Delhi which promotes grassroots level games. This will help the children not only with sports or personality, but also with their studies.” last_img read more